Category Archives for "Managed Services News"

Jul 23

DNS Requests: DoH Can Help Balance Privacy, Control & Visibility

By | Managed Services News

DoH, applied across the entire system, helps ensure privacy over DNS requests while maintaining control and visibility into network activity.

While the proliferation of encrypted DNS is being driven by consumer privacy, businesses will want to take notice. Encrypted DNS–also known as DNS over HTTPS, or DoH–obscures internet traffic from bad actors. But it also has the potential to decrease visibility for IT admins whose responsibility it is to manage DNS requests for their organizations. So, what’s the solution? Strangely, DoH.

As previously mentioned, DoH is now the default for Mozilla Firefox. It’s also available in Google Chrome and other Chromium-based browsers. This is a win for consumers, who have newfound control over who can see where they’re going on the internet.

However, by surrendering control over DNS requests to the browser, IT administrators lose the ability to apply filtering to DNS requests. Encrypted DNS that skirts the operating system eliminates the visibility that IT admins need to ensure security for internet traffic on their networks. It also prevents the business from being able to run threat intelligence against DNS requests and identify dynamic malware that could circumvent consumer DoH implementations. This leads to gaps in security that businesses can’t afford.

Staying Ahead of the Curve

There is a way to ensure privacy over DNS requests while maintaining control and visibility into network activity. The solution is to apply DoH across the entire system, not just browser activity. By wresting control over DNS requests from the browser, the agent can instruct Firefox not to engage its DoH feature. The same holds true for Chrome users running DoH. These requests are passed back through the operating system, where the DNS solution can manage them directly. This helps support both filtering and visibility.

An advanced agent will manage DNS requests on the device securely through DoH so the requests go directly to the server with no other entity having visibility into them. At the same time, the agent can apply threat intelligence to ensure requests aren’t resolving to malicious destinations. Admins have visibility into all DNS requests, and the requests are encrypted.

When the agent detects a prohibited resource, it returns the IP address of a block page. So, if there’s a virus on the system and it’s trying to access a command and control server to deliver a malicious payload, it won’t be able to. It also prevents botnets from being able to connect since they also leverage DNS. For any process that requests something from the internet, if it doesn’t get the resource that it’s requesting, it’s not going to be able to act on it.

Privacy Plus Security

The novel coronavirus didn’t start the mobile workforce phenomenon, but it certainly has accelerated it. The traditional perimeter firewall with all systems and devices living behind it no longer exists. Modern networks extend to wherever users connect to the internet. This includes the router someone bought from a kid down the street, as well as the home network that was set up by a consulting company 10 years ago and hasn’t been patched or updated since.

When people open a browser on their home network and go to their favorites, they’re not expecting to get phished. But if they’re resolving to an alternative IP address because DNS is not being managed, is broken or is being redirected, they may be exposed to phishing sites. Enter encrypted DNS as another layer of protection within your cyber resilience portfolio. It starts working against a higher percentage of threats when you stack it with other layers, reducing the likelihood of being infected. It also addresses a blind spot that allows exploits to go undetected.

Embracing DoH

Privacy is the main driver for DoH adoption by consumers, while business agendas are generally driven by security. As a business, controlling DNS requests allows you to protect both the business and the user. If you don’t have that control and visibility, the user is potentially more exposed. And, if you don’t apply threat intelligence and filtering to DNS requests, a user can more easily click on malware or land on a phishing site.

To learn more about encrypted DNS read the whitepaper or review the FAQs.

 Jonathan Barnett is a Product Manager for Webroot’s business network solutions. With 20 years’ experience as a Network Engineer and MSP, Jonathan has a deep understanding of both the technical and business challenges of the SMB and MSP market. Jonathan currently leads Webroot’s DNS Protection solution, which he has helped guide and shape since its release in 2017.

Jonathan Barnett-Webroot

This guest blog is part of a Channel Futures sponsorship.

Jul 23

Lenovo Partner Portal Gets Major Overhaul, Improves Experience

By | Managed Services News

Speed, efficiency and automation drive the Lenovo Partner Hub.

The Lenovo Partner Portal just got a major makeover. The newly launched Global Partner Hub now offers personalized and real-time sales tools, partner enablement and more.

It features a one-stop solution design that’s global and unifies Intelligent Devices Group (IDG) and Data Center Group (DCG) partners. Partner feedback signaled that a new portal was overdue.

Lenovo's Rob Cato

Lenovo’s Rob Cato

“This is the next iteration of Lenovo’s commitment to our go-to-market strategy, which is absolutely through the North America channel,” Rob Cato, vice president, North America channel, Lenovo IDG. “It’s been a long time coming. We’ve spent several years getting ourselves to this point, lots of man hours, and invested millions of dollars to bring the Lenovo Partner Hub to fruition.”

The Lenovo Partner Hub, powered by advanced analytics, aims to take users to the next level of partner and customer experience.

Here are some features partners will find in the new Partner Hub.

  • Improved visibility and enhanced product catalogues and co-marketing suggestions.
  • More relevant solutions according to customer needs and history.
  • Enriched content personalization based on a partner’s key responsibilities.
  • Customer and solution-centric messaging.
  • Intelligent pricing: streamlined and integrated pricing engine with deal registration and new customer bonus/acquisition bonus all in one place.
  • Digital co-selling: digital marketing assets, partner-ready services, specialist programs and rewards.
  • Digital processes: realizing efficiencies and speed of execution from opportunity, quotation, order and rewards.

More Features

Other feature designs increase productivity and speed up sales for partners. For example, the hub features instant pricing for SMBs and midmarket deals; accelerated turnaround of deal registration and new customer bonus/acquisition bonus requests; faster turnaround on rebate payment; a reduction in claim turnaround and increase in claim automation.

“One of the things that both partners and Lenovo are excited about is the ability for small and medium business customer opportunities to use the Lenovo Bid Portal. They can raise a deal registration or new customer opportunity and then leverage the Lenovo Bid Portal to submit a bid opportunity directly to Lenovo and get pricing back from Lenovo in a matter of minutes,” said Cato. “The speed to price across both our PCSD business and DCG business is a critical function, especially in the new world that I think we’re all headed to.”

The new hub design includes mobile access from a phone, laptop or tablet. So partners can access the full catalog of products.

“The product catalog is a marriage between several other separate tools in one integrated platform,” said Julie Wogelius, senior manager and global process owner, Lenovo Partner Hub.

Access to partner enablement and training is also on the new hub.

Lenovo's Steve Biondi

Lenovo’s Steve Biondi

“We have an opportunity as Lenovo to bring forward a platform on which partners can transact efficiently, safely and securely,” Steve Biondi, North America channel chief, Lenovo DCG, said in a news briefing.

The new DCG partner program launched on April 1, with the new chief, reinforcing Lenovo’s partner-first strategy.

The Hub debuts first across Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) and North America. Other locations, including Asia Pacific and Latin America, will follow in the coming months.

Jul 23

DNS Requests: DoH Can Help Balance Privacy, Control & Visibility

By | Managed Services News

DoH, applied across the entire system, helps ensure privacy over DNS requests while maintaining control and visibility into network activity.

While the proliferation of encrypted DNS is being driven by consumer privacy, businesses will want to take notice. Encrypted DNS–also known as DNS over HTTPS, or DoH–obscures internet traffic from bad actors. But it also has the potential to decrease visibility for IT admins whose responsibility it is to manage DNS requests for their organizations. So, what’s the solution? Strangely, DoH.

As previously mentioned, DoH is now the default for Mozilla Firefox. It’s also available in Google Chrome and other Chromium-based browsers. This is a win for consumers, who have newfound control over who can see where they’re going on the internet.

However, by surrendering control over DNS requests to the browser, IT administrators lose the ability to apply filtering to DNS requests. Encrypted DNS that skirts the operating system eliminates the visibility that IT admins need to ensure security for internet traffic on their networks. It also prevents the business from being able to run threat intelligence against DNS requests and identify dynamic malware that could circumvent consumer DoH implementations. This leads to gaps in security that businesses can’t afford.

Staying Ahead of the Curve

There is a way to ensure privacy over DNS requests while maintaining control and visibility into network activity. The solution is to apply DoH across the entire system, not just browser activity. By wresting control over DNS requests from the browser, the agent can instruct Firefox not to engage its DoH feature. The same holds true for Chrome users running DoH. These requests are passed back through the operating system, where the DNS solution can manage them directly. This helps support both filtering and visibility.

An advanced agent will manage DNS requests on the device securely through DoH so the requests go directly to the server with no other entity having visibility into them. At the same time, the agent can apply threat intelligence to ensure requests aren’t resolving to malicious destinations. Admins have visibility into all DNS requests, and the requests are encrypted.

When the agent detects a prohibited resource, it returns the IP address of a block page. So, if there’s a virus on the system and it’s trying to access a command and control server to deliver a malicious payload, it won’t be able to. It also prevents botnets from being able to connect since they also leverage DNS. For any process that requests something from the internet, if it doesn’t get the resource that it’s requesting, it’s not going to be able to act on it.

Privacy Plus Security

The novel coronavirus didn’t start the mobile workforce phenomenon, but it certainly has accelerated it. The traditional perimeter firewall with all systems and devices living behind it no longer exists. Modern networks extend to wherever users connect to the internet. This includes the router someone bought from a kid down the street, as well as the home network that was set up by a consulting company 10 years ago and hasn’t been patched or updated since.

When people open a browser on their home network and go to their favorites, they’re not expecting to get phished. But if they’re resolving to an alternative IP address because DNS is not being managed, is broken or is being redirected, they may be exposed to phishing sites. Enter encrypted DNS as another layer of protection within your cyber resilience portfolio. It starts working against a higher percentage of threats when you stack it with other layers, reducing the likelihood of being infected. It also addresses a blind spot that allows exploits to go undetected.

Embracing DoH

Privacy is the main driver for DoH adoption by consumers, while business agendas are generally driven by security. As a business, controlling DNS requests allows you to protect both the business and the user. If you don’t have that control and visibility, the user is potentially more exposed. And, if you don’t apply threat intelligence and filtering to DNS requests, a user can more easily click on malware or land on a phishing site.

To learn more about encrypted DNS read the whitepaper or review the FAQs.

 Jonathan Barnett is a Product Manager for Webroot’s business network solutions. With 20 years’ experience as a Network Engineer and MSP, Jonathan has a deep understanding of both the technical and business challenges of the SMB and MSP market. Jonathan currently leads Webroot’s DNS Protection solution, which he has helped guide and shape since its release in 2017.

Jonathan Barnett-Webroot

This guest blog is part of a Channel Futures sponsorship.

Jul 23

DNS Requests: DoH Can Help Balance Privacy, Control & Visibility

By | Managed Services News

DoH, applied across the entire system, helps ensure privacy over DNS requests while maintaining control and visibility into network activity.

While the proliferation of encrypted DNS is being driven by consumer privacy, businesses will want to take notice. Encrypted DNS–also known as DNS over HTTPS, or DoH–obscures internet traffic from bad actors. But it also has the potential to decrease visibility for IT admins whose responsibility it is to manage DNS requests for their organizations. So, what’s the solution? Strangely, DoH.

As previously mentioned, DoH is now the default for Mozilla Firefox. It’s also available in Google Chrome and other Chromium-based browsers. This is a win for consumers, who have newfound control over who can see where they’re going on the internet.

However, by surrendering control over DNS requests to the browser, IT administrators lose the ability to apply filtering to DNS requests. Encrypted DNS that skirts the operating system eliminates the visibility that IT admins need to ensure security for internet traffic on their networks. It also prevents the business from being able to run threat intelligence against DNS requests and identify dynamic malware that could circumvent consumer DoH implementations. This leads to gaps in security that businesses can’t afford.

Staying Ahead of the Curve

There is a way to ensure privacy over DNS requests while maintaining control and visibility into network activity. The solution is to apply DoH across the entire system, not just browser activity. By wresting control over DNS requests from the browser, the agent can instruct Firefox not to engage its DoH feature. The same holds true for Chrome users running DoH. These requests are passed back through the operating system, where the DNS solution can manage them directly. This helps support both filtering and visibility.

An advanced agent will manage DNS requests on the device securely through DoH so the requests go directly to the server with no other entity having visibility into them. At the same time, the agent can apply threat intelligence to ensure requests aren’t resolving to malicious destinations. Admins have visibility into all DNS requests, and the requests are encrypted.

When the agent detects a prohibited resource, it returns the IP address of a block page. So, if there’s a virus on the system and it’s trying to access a command and control server to deliver a malicious payload, it won’t be able to. It also prevents botnets from being able to connect since they also leverage DNS. For any process that requests something from the internet, if it doesn’t get the resource that it’s requesting, it’s not going to be able to act on it.

Privacy Plus Security

The novel coronavirus didn’t start the mobile workforce phenomenon, but it certainly has accelerated it. The traditional perimeter firewall with all systems and devices living behind it no longer exists. Modern networks extend to wherever users connect to the internet. This includes the router someone bought from a kid down the street, as well as the home network that was set up by a consulting company 10 years ago and hasn’t been patched or updated since.

When people open a browser on their home network and go to their favorites, they’re not expecting to get phished. But if they’re resolving to an alternative IP address because DNS is not being managed, is broken or is being redirected, they may be exposed to phishing sites. Enter encrypted DNS as another layer of protection within your cyber resilience portfolio. It starts working against a higher percentage of threats when you stack it with other layers, reducing the likelihood of being infected. It also addresses a blind spot that allows exploits to go undetected.

Embracing DoH

Privacy is the main driver for DoH adoption by consumers, while business agendas are generally driven by security. As a business, controlling DNS requests allows you to protect both the business and the user. If you don’t have that control and visibility, the user is potentially more exposed. And, if you don’t apply threat intelligence and filtering to DNS requests, a user can more easily click on malware or land on a phishing site.

To learn more about encrypted DNS read the whitepaper or review the FAQs.

 Jonathan Barnett is a Product Manager for Webroot’s business network solutions. With 20 years’ experience as a Network Engineer and MSP, Jonathan has a deep understanding of both the technical and business challenges of the SMB and MSP market. Jonathan currently leads Webroot’s DNS Protection solution, which he has helped guide and shape since its release in 2017.

Jonathan Barnett-Webroot

This guest blog is part of a Channel Futures sponsorship.

Jul 23

StorMagic Heralds Partner Opportunity with Expansion Into Security Market

By | Managed Services News

StorMagic is going after a new set of customers and partners following its acquisition of KeyNexus.

StorMagic’s entry into the security market means more options and greater profit for partners, says CRO Brian Grainger.

The firm expanded into security after acquiring Canadian cybersecurity company KeyNexus in April. The deal added SvKMS to its product portfolio, a single platform for managing all user encryption keys.

StorMagic's Brian Grainger

StorMagic’s Brian Grainger

“By entering the security market, we have been able to double our total available market (TAM) and enter into the core data center,” said Grainger.

“Prior to the acquisition, our SvSAN product only focused on storage at the edge,” said Grainger. “But with SvKMS, we are now able to reach security customers who are using the cloud and data center as well. It also allows us to expand into VARs that have security as their main competency. We can also offer even more to our current VAR base that already have customers interested in security solutions.”

StorMagic MSP Program

Last month, the firm announced a new MSP program, which allows partners to integrate SvKMS into their own services suite. They can now offer encryption key management for their customers to use for any on-premises or cloud-based use case. MSPs can build the offering in their own data center, colocation data center, or in any cloud.

“MSP partners can now package and deliver differentiated data security that is easy to administer by leveraging [a] security solution that is designed for any use case or workflow. It can also be run anywhere, from the edge to the core,” said Grainger.

StorMagic has 35 channel partners in the UK and 269 throughout Europe, the Middle East and Africa. It says 100% of its sales go through the channel.

Grainger maintains that prior to acquisition, KeyNexus was a technology startup heavily weighted on engineering and product. As such, it did not have a developed partner programme. SvKMS has therefore been incorporated as an additional product for existing StorMagic channel partners. They can now get deal registration protection on the product and get the same benefits as they have with SvSAN.

Additionally, StorMagic is reconfiguring the training on its partner portal to include SvKMS.

Jul 23

DNS Requests: DoH Can Help Balance Privacy, Control & Visibility

By | Managed Services News

DoH, applied across the entire system, helps ensure privacy over DNS requests while maintaining control and visibility into network activity.

While the proliferation of encrypted DNS is being driven by consumer privacy, businesses will want to take notice. Encrypted DNS–also known as DNS over HTTPS, or DoH–obscures internet traffic from bad actors. But it also has the potential to decrease visibility for IT admins whose responsibility it is to manage DNS requests for their organizations. So, what’s the solution? Strangely, DoH.

As previously mentioned, DoH is now the default for Mozilla Firefox. It’s also available in Google Chrome and other Chromium-based browsers. This is a win for consumers, who have newfound control over who can see where they’re going on the internet.

However, by surrendering control over DNS requests to the browser, IT administrators lose the ability to apply filtering to DNS requests. Encrypted DNS that skirts the operating system eliminates the visibility that IT admins need to ensure security for internet traffic on their networks. It also prevents the business from being able to run threat intelligence against DNS requests and identify dynamic malware that could circumvent consumer DoH implementations. This leads to gaps in security that businesses can’t afford.

Staying Ahead of the Curve

There is a way to ensure privacy over DNS requests while maintaining control and visibility into network activity. The solution is to apply DoH across the entire system, not just browser activity. By wresting control over DNS requests from the browser, the agent can instruct Firefox not to engage its DoH feature. The same holds true for Chrome users running DoH. These requests are passed back through the operating system, where the DNS solution can manage them directly. This helps support both filtering and visibility.

An advanced agent will manage DNS requests on the device securely through DoH so the requests go directly to the server with no other entity having visibility into them. At the same time, the agent can apply threat intelligence to ensure requests aren’t resolving to malicious destinations. Admins have visibility into all DNS requests, and the requests are encrypted.

When the agent detects a prohibited resource, it returns the IP address of a block page. So, if there’s a virus on the system and it’s trying to access a command and control server to deliver a malicious payload, it won’t be able to. It also prevents botnets from being able to connect since they also leverage DNS. For any process that requests something from the internet, if it doesn’t get the resource that it’s requesting, it’s not going to be able to act on it.

Privacy Plus Security

The novel coronavirus didn’t start the mobile workforce phenomenon, but it certainly has accelerated it. The traditional perimeter firewall with all systems and devices living behind it no longer exists. Modern networks extend to wherever users connect to the internet. This includes the router someone bought from a kid down the street, as well as the home network that was set up by a consulting company 10 years ago and hasn’t been patched or updated since.

When people open a browser on their home network and go to their favorites, they’re not expecting to get phished. But if they’re resolving to an alternative IP address because DNS is not being managed, is broken or is being redirected, they may be exposed to phishing sites. Enter encrypted DNS as another layer of protection within your cyber resilience portfolio. It starts working against a higher percentage of threats when you stack it with other layers, reducing the likelihood of being infected. It also addresses a blind spot that allows exploits to go undetected.

Embracing DoH

Privacy is the main driver for DoH adoption by consumers, while business agendas are generally driven by security. As a business, controlling DNS requests allows you to protect both the business and the user. If you don’t have that control and visibility, the user is potentially more exposed. And, if you don’t apply threat intelligence and filtering to DNS requests, a user can more easily click on malware or land on a phishing site.

To learn more about encrypted DNS read the whitepaper or review the FAQs.

 Jonathan Barnett is a Product Manager for Webroot’s business network solutions. With 20 years’ experience as a Network Engineer and MSP, Jonathan has a deep understanding of both the technical and business challenges of the SMB and MSP market. Jonathan currently leads Webroot’s DNS Protection solution, which he has helped guide and shape since its release in 2017.

Jonathan Barnett-Webroot

This guest blog is part of a Channel Futures sponsorship.

Jul 23

DNS Requests: DoH Can Help Balance Privacy, Control & Visibility

By | Managed Services News

DoH, applied across the entire system, helps ensure privacy over DNS requests while maintaining control and visibility into network activity.

While the proliferation of encrypted DNS is being driven by consumer privacy, businesses will want to take notice. Encrypted DNS–also known as DNS over HTTPS, or DoH–obscures internet traffic from bad actors. But it also has the potential to decrease visibility for IT admins whose responsibility it is to manage DNS requests for their organizations. So, what’s the solution? Strangely, DoH.

As previously mentioned, DoH is now the default for Mozilla Firefox. It’s also available in Google Chrome and other Chromium-based browsers. This is a win for consumers, who have newfound control over who can see where they’re going on the internet.

However, by surrendering control over DNS requests to the browser, IT administrators lose the ability to apply filtering to DNS requests. Encrypted DNS that skirts the operating system eliminates the visibility that IT admins need to ensure security for internet traffic on their networks. It also prevents the business from being able to run threat intelligence against DNS requests and identify dynamic malware that could circumvent consumer DoH implementations. This leads to gaps in security that businesses can’t afford.

Staying Ahead of the Curve

There is a way to ensure privacy over DNS requests while maintaining control and visibility into network activity. The solution is to apply DoH across the entire system, not just browser activity. By wresting control over DNS requests from the browser, the agent can instruct Firefox not to engage its DoH feature. The same holds true for Chrome users running DoH. These requests are passed back through the operating system, where the DNS solution can manage them directly. This helps support both filtering and visibility.

An advanced agent will manage DNS requests on the device securely through DoH so the requests go directly to the server with no other entity having visibility into them. At the same time, the agent can apply threat intelligence to ensure requests aren’t resolving to malicious destinations. Admins have visibility into all DNS requests, and the requests are encrypted.

When the agent detects a prohibited resource, it returns the IP address of a block page. So, if there’s a virus on the system and it’s trying to access a command and control server to deliver a malicious payload, it won’t be able to. It also prevents botnets from being able to connect since they also leverage DNS. For any process that requests something from the internet, if it doesn’t get the resource that it’s requesting, it’s not going to be able to act on it.

Privacy Plus Security

The novel coronavirus didn’t start the mobile workforce phenomenon, but it certainly has accelerated it. The traditional perimeter firewall with all systems and devices living behind it no longer exists. Modern networks extend to wherever users connect to the internet. This includes the router someone bought from a kid down the street, as well as the home network that was set up by a consulting company 10 years ago and hasn’t been patched or updated since.

When people open a browser on their home network and go to their favorites, they’re not expecting to get phished. But if they’re resolving to an alternative IP address because DNS is not being managed, is broken or is being redirected, they may be exposed to phishing sites. Enter encrypted DNS as another layer of protection within your cyber resilience portfolio. It starts working against a higher percentage of threats when you stack it with other layers, reducing the likelihood of being infected. It also addresses a blind spot that allows exploits to go undetected.

Embracing DoH

Privacy is the main driver for DoH adoption by consumers, while business agendas are generally driven by security. As a business, controlling DNS requests allows you to protect both the business and the user. If you don’t have that control and visibility, the user is potentially more exposed. And, if you don’t apply threat intelligence and filtering to DNS requests, a user can more easily click on malware or land on a phishing site.

To learn more about encrypted DNS read the whitepaper or review the FAQs.

 Jonathan Barnett is a Product Manager for Webroot’s business network solutions. With 20 years’ experience as a Network Engineer and MSP, Jonathan has a deep understanding of both the technical and business challenges of the SMB and MSP market. Jonathan currently leads Webroot’s DNS Protection solution, which he has helped guide and shape since its release in 2017.

Jonathan Barnett-Webroot

This guest blog is part of a Channel Futures sponsorship.

Jul 23

DNS Requests: DoH Can Help Balance Privacy, Control & Visibility

By | Managed Services News

DoH, applied across the entire system, helps ensure privacy over DNS requests while maintaining control and visibility into network activity.

While the proliferation of encrypted DNS is being driven by consumer privacy, businesses will want to take notice. Encrypted DNS–also known as DNS over HTTPS, or DoH–obscures internet traffic from bad actors. But it also has the potential to decrease visibility for IT admins whose responsibility it is to manage DNS requests for their organizations. So, what’s the solution? Strangely, DoH.

As previously mentioned, DoH is now the default for Mozilla Firefox. It’s also available in Google Chrome and other Chromium-based browsers. This is a win for consumers, who have newfound control over who can see where they’re going on the internet.

However, by surrendering control over DNS requests to the browser, IT administrators lose the ability to apply filtering to DNS requests. Encrypted DNS that skirts the operating system eliminates the visibility that IT admins need to ensure security for internet traffic on their networks. It also prevents the business from being able to run threat intelligence against DNS requests and identify dynamic malware that could circumvent consumer DoH implementations. This leads to gaps in security that businesses can’t afford.

Staying Ahead of the Curve

There is a way to ensure privacy over DNS requests while maintaining control and visibility into network activity. The solution is to apply DoH across the entire system, not just browser activity. By wresting control over DNS requests from the browser, the agent can instruct Firefox not to engage its DoH feature. The same holds true for Chrome users running DoH. These requests are passed back through the operating system, where the DNS solution can manage them directly. This helps support both filtering and visibility.

An advanced agent will manage DNS requests on the device securely through DoH so the requests go directly to the server with no other entity having visibility into them. At the same time, the agent can apply threat intelligence to ensure requests aren’t resolving to malicious destinations. Admins have visibility into all DNS requests, and the requests are encrypted.

When the agent detects a prohibited resource, it returns the IP address of a block page. So, if there’s a virus on the system and it’s trying to access a command and control server to deliver a malicious payload, it won’t be able to. It also prevents botnets from being able to connect since they also leverage DNS. For any process that requests something from the internet, if it doesn’t get the resource that it’s requesting, it’s not going to be able to act on it.

Privacy Plus Security

The novel coronavirus didn’t start the mobile workforce phenomenon, but it certainly has accelerated it. The traditional perimeter firewall with all systems and devices living behind it no longer exists. Modern networks extend to wherever users connect to the internet. This includes the router someone bought from a kid down the street, as well as the home network that was set up by a consulting company 10 years ago and hasn’t been patched or updated since.

When people open a browser on their home network and go to their favorites, they’re not expecting to get phished. But if they’re resolving to an alternative IP address because DNS is not being managed, is broken or is being redirected, they may be exposed to phishing sites. Enter encrypted DNS as another layer of protection within your cyber resilience portfolio. It starts working against a higher percentage of threats when you stack it with other layers, reducing the likelihood of being infected. It also addresses a blind spot that allows exploits to go undetected.

Embracing DoH

Privacy is the main driver for DoH adoption by consumers, while business agendas are generally driven by security. As a business, controlling DNS requests allows you to protect both the business and the user. If you don’t have that control and visibility, the user is potentially more exposed. And, if you don’t apply threat intelligence and filtering to DNS requests, a user can more easily click on malware or land on a phishing site.

To learn more about encrypted DNS read the whitepaper or review the FAQs.

 Jonathan Barnett is a Product Manager for Webroot’s business network solutions. With 20 years’ experience as a Network Engineer and MSP, Jonathan has a deep understanding of both the technical and business challenges of the SMB and MSP market. Jonathan currently leads Webroot’s DNS Protection solution, which he has helped guide and shape since its release in 2017.

Jonathan Barnett-Webroot

This guest blog is part of a Channel Futures sponsorship.

Jul 23

DNS Requests: DoH Can Help Balance Privacy, Control & Visibility

By | Managed Services News

DoH, applied across the entire system, helps ensure privacy over DNS requests while maintaining control and visibility into network activity.

While the proliferation of encrypted DNS is being driven by consumer privacy, businesses will want to take notice. Encrypted DNS–also known as DNS over HTTPS, or DoH–obscures internet traffic from bad actors. But it also has the potential to decrease visibility for IT admins whose responsibility it is to manage DNS requests for their organizations. So, what’s the solution? Strangely, DoH.

As previously mentioned, DoH is now the default for Mozilla Firefox. It’s also available in Google Chrome and other Chromium-based browsers. This is a win for consumers, who have newfound control over who can see where they’re going on the internet.

However, by surrendering control over DNS requests to the browser, IT administrators lose the ability to apply filtering to DNS requests. Encrypted DNS that skirts the operating system eliminates the visibility that IT admins need to ensure security for internet traffic on their networks. It also prevents the business from being able to run threat intelligence against DNS requests and identify dynamic malware that could circumvent consumer DoH implementations. This leads to gaps in security that businesses can’t afford.

Staying Ahead of the Curve

There is a way to ensure privacy over DNS requests while maintaining control and visibility into network activity. The solution is to apply DoH across the entire system, not just browser activity. By wresting control over DNS requests from the browser, the agent can instruct Firefox not to engage its DoH feature. The same holds true for Chrome users running DoH. These requests are passed back through the operating system, where the DNS solution can manage them directly. This helps support both filtering and visibility.

An advanced agent will manage DNS requests on the device securely through DoH so the requests go directly to the server with no other entity having visibility into them. At the same time, the agent can apply threat intelligence to ensure requests aren’t resolving to malicious destinations. Admins have visibility into all DNS requests, and the requests are encrypted.

When the agent detects a prohibited resource, it returns the IP address of a block page. So, if there’s a virus on the system and it’s trying to access a command and control server to deliver a malicious payload, it won’t be able to. It also prevents botnets from being able to connect since they also leverage DNS. For any process that requests something from the internet, if it doesn’t get the resource that it’s requesting, it’s not going to be able to act on it.

Privacy Plus Security

The novel coronavirus didn’t start the mobile workforce phenomenon, but it certainly has accelerated it. The traditional perimeter firewall with all systems and devices living behind it no longer exists. Modern networks extend to wherever users connect to the internet. This includes the router someone bought from a kid down the street, as well as the home network that was set up by a consulting company 10 years ago and hasn’t been patched or updated since.

When people open a browser on their home network and go to their favorites, they’re not expecting to get phished. But if they’re resolving to an alternative IP address because DNS is not being managed, is broken or is being redirected, they may be exposed to phishing sites. Enter encrypted DNS as another layer of protection within your cyber resilience portfolio. It starts working against a higher percentage of threats when you stack it with other layers, reducing the likelihood of being infected. It also addresses a blind spot that allows exploits to go undetected.

Embracing DoH

Privacy is the main driver for DoH adoption by consumers, while business agendas are generally driven by security. As a business, controlling DNS requests allows you to protect both the business and the user. If you don’t have that control and visibility, the user is potentially more exposed. And, if you don’t apply threat intelligence and filtering to DNS requests, a user can more easily click on malware or land on a phishing site.

To learn more about encrypted DNS read the whitepaper or review the FAQs.

 Jonathan Barnett is a Product Manager for Webroot’s business network solutions. With 20 years’ experience as a Network Engineer and MSP, Jonathan has a deep understanding of both the technical and business challenges of the SMB and MSP market. Jonathan currently leads Webroot’s DNS Protection solution, which he has helped guide and shape since its release in 2017.

Jonathan Barnett-Webroot

This guest blog is part of a Channel Futures sponsorship.

Jul 23

DNS Requests: DoH Can Help Balance Privacy, Control & Visibility

By | Managed Services News

DoH, applied across the entire system, helps ensure privacy over DNS requests while maintaining control and visibility into network activity.

While the proliferation of encrypted DNS is being driven by consumer privacy, businesses will want to take notice. Encrypted DNS–also known as DNS over HTTPS, or DoH–obscures internet traffic from bad actors. But it also has the potential to decrease visibility for IT admins whose responsibility it is to manage DNS requests for their organizations. So, what’s the solution? Strangely, DoH.

As previously mentioned, DoH is now the default for Mozilla Firefox. It’s also available in Google Chrome and other Chromium-based browsers. This is a win for consumers, who have newfound control over who can see where they’re going on the internet.

However, by surrendering control over DNS requests to the browser, IT administrators lose the ability to apply filtering to DNS requests. Encrypted DNS that skirts the operating system eliminates the visibility that IT admins need to ensure security for internet traffic on their networks. It also prevents the business from being able to run threat intelligence against DNS requests and identify dynamic malware that could circumvent consumer DoH implementations. This leads to gaps in security that businesses can’t afford.

Staying Ahead of the Curve

There is a way to ensure privacy over DNS requests while maintaining control and visibility into network activity. The solution is to apply DoH across the entire system, not just browser activity. By wresting control over DNS requests from the browser, the agent can instruct Firefox not to engage its DoH feature. The same holds true for Chrome users running DoH. These requests are passed back through the operating system, where the DNS solution can manage them directly. This helps support both filtering and visibility.

An advanced agent will manage DNS requests on the device securely through DoH so the requests go directly to the server with no other entity having visibility into them. At the same time, the agent can apply threat intelligence to ensure requests aren’t resolving to malicious destinations. Admins have visibility into all DNS requests, and the requests are encrypted.

When the agent detects a prohibited resource, it returns the IP address of a block page. So, if there’s a virus on the system and it’s trying to access a command and control server to deliver a malicious payload, it won’t be able to. It also prevents botnets from being able to connect since they also leverage DNS. For any process that requests something from the internet, if it doesn’t get the resource that it’s requesting, it’s not going to be able to act on it.

Privacy Plus Security

The novel coronavirus didn’t start the mobile workforce phenomenon, but it certainly has accelerated it. The traditional perimeter firewall with all systems and devices living behind it no longer exists. Modern networks extend to wherever users connect to the internet. This includes the router someone bought from a kid down the street, as well as the home network that was set up by a consulting company 10 years ago and hasn’t been patched or updated since.

When people open a browser on their home network and go to their favorites, they’re not expecting to get phished. But if they’re resolving to an alternative IP address because DNS is not being managed, is broken or is being redirected, they may be exposed to phishing sites. Enter encrypted DNS as another layer of protection within your cyber resilience portfolio. It starts working against a higher percentage of threats when you stack it with other layers, reducing the likelihood of being infected. It also addresses a blind spot that allows exploits to go undetected.

Embracing DoH

Privacy is the main driver for DoH adoption by consumers, while business agendas are generally driven by security. As a business, controlling DNS requests allows you to protect both the business and the user. If you don’t have that control and visibility, the user is potentially more exposed. And, if you don’t apply threat intelligence and filtering to DNS requests, a user can more easily click on malware or land on a phishing site.

To learn more about encrypted DNS read the whitepaper or review the FAQs.

 Jonathan Barnett is a Product Manager for Webroot’s business network solutions. With 20 years’ experience as a Network Engineer and MSP, Jonathan has a deep understanding of both the technical and business challenges of the SMB and MSP market. Jonathan currently leads Webroot’s DNS Protection solution, which he has helped guide and shape since its release in 2017.

Jonathan Barnett-Webroot

This guest blog is part of a Channel Futures sponsorship.

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