Category Archives for "Managed Services News"

Aug 25

Diversity & Inclusion How-To: TBI’s Resonate Committee

By | Managed Services News

The committee encourages TBI’s nearly 300 employees to “Speak Strong. Listen Loud.”

TBI’s Diversity & Inclusion Committee (Resonate) was still being developed when the events of June 2020 made it a priority.

TBI's Bryan Reynolds

TBI’s Bryan Reynolds

“The events of that summer definitely were a catalyst,” said Bryan Reynolds, TBI’s director of sales operations.

“We wanted to be able to give everybody involved with the company a safe space to come and talk about everything that was happening in the world.”

“People need a place where they can ask questions and share experiences. Where they can talk about how the headlines make them feel, their fears — just generally learn from one another,” said Reynolds.

TBI's Ashley Kain

TBI’s Ashley Kain

Reynolds and Ashley Kain, TBI’s office manager and executive assistant, co-founded and currently co-chair the committee.

Open Share

The committee, launched in June 2020, was well-received by employees. The group meets once a month. Each meeting starts with an “open share,” which allows participants to share anything they want with the group.

“It could be their struggles, their successes or their concerns,” Reynolds said. “That gives us a starting point for the kind of conversations that people generally don’t want to have.”

“We have a comfortable, safe space to ask the uncomfortable questions. We all learn from that. And that’s what stimulates most of the conversation.”

“Ashley and I will also have some topics of discussion. For example, in our last meeting we talked about how to be a good ally in the workplace and things we can do to be better allies.”

Bryan Reynolds is a charter member of the Channel Futures DE&I 101. The list, which debuted earlier this month, honors 101 individuals from multicultural backgrounds who are working to promote diversity, equity and inclusion in the ICT channel.

“We also encourage our members to give back to the community. For example, we recently teamed up with Meals on Wheels for Chicago. We registered for their virtual 5K to help raise funds and awareness. We’re going to do a lot more like that in the coming months.”

“We also maintain an internal SharePoint page where we upload the articles that we talk about in our meetings. There’s a diversity days calendar that we go through every month to highlight specific days around diversity so we can celebrate those.”

“In addition, we have a Yammer page where people can keep conversations going outside of the meetings. They can post any relevant articles, news headlines, TED Talks — things like that.”

Finding an Identity

Once the group was up and running, Reynolds and Kain decided it needed to be more than just the “Diversity & Inclusion Committee.” It needed an identity.

“I was thinking of what we actually do in the group,” said Reynolds. “We give people an opportunity to speak. We give them a voice, a platform to share their experiences. The purpose of this group is to give people an opportunity to resonate verbally, spiritually amd emotionally, so that people can learn from one another. The name ‘Resonate’ fit perfectly.”

A Safe Space

Kain admits that it took a while for employees to feel comfortable opening up on uncomfortable topics. “In the beginning, everyone was keen on being a part of the group, but it took a while for them to realize it really was a safe space. A couple of people volunteered at the beginning to open share. Then we had a couple of volunteer speakers in the meetings. And that’s when people started to feel comfortable opening up.”

“Since then, it’s been amazing to how something that Bryan and I built from the ground up has become a place where employees get to share experiences, life stories, concerns and questions with no judgment, no attacking.”

No Magic Formula

Reynolds and Kain stress that there’s no magic formula for what they did. “We just recognized that there was a need,” Kain said. “So we set about meeting it.”

“We didn’t really know where to start. It was just put together step by step. We started with foundational items like the mission statement and went from there.”

The duo enlisted the aid of a few committee members to develop things like meeting content and community outreach.

“I’m not sure anyone really knows where or how to start,” said Kain. “My biggest piece of advice would be…

Aug 25

Diversity & Inclusion How-To: TBI’s Resonate Committee

By | Managed Services News

The committee encourages TBI’s nearly 300 employees to “Speak Strong. Listen Loud.”

TBI’s Diversity & Inclusion Committee (Resonate) was still being developed when the events of June 2020 made it a priority.

TBI's Bryan Reynolds

TBI’s Bryan Reynolds

“The events of that summer definitely were a catalyst,” said Bryan Reynolds, TBI’s director of sales operations.

“We wanted to be able to give everybody involved with the company a safe space to come and talk about everything that was happening in the world.”

“People need a place where they can ask questions and share experiences. Where they can talk about how the headlines make them feel, their fears — just generally learn from one another,” said Reynolds.

TBI's Ashley Kain

TBI’s Ashley Kain

Reynolds and Ashley Kain, TBI’s office manager and executive assistant, co-founded and currently co-chair the committee.

Open Share

The committee, launched in June 2020, was well-received by employees. The group meets once a month. Each meeting starts with an “open share,” which allows participants to share anything they want with the group.

“It could be their struggles, their successes or their concerns,” Reynolds said. “That gives us a starting point for the kind of conversations that people generally don’t want to have.”

“We have a comfortable, safe space to ask the uncomfortable questions. We all learn from that. And that’s what stimulates most of the conversation.”

“Ashley and I will also have some topics of discussion. For example, in our last meeting we talked about how to be a good ally in the workplace and things we can do to be better allies.”

Bryan Reynolds is a charter member of the Channel Futures DE&I 101. The list, which debuted earlier this month, honors 101 individuals from multicultural backgrounds who are working to promote diversity, equity and inclusion in the ICT channel.

“We also encourage our members to give back to the community. For example, we recently teamed up with Meals on Wheels for Chicago. We registered for their virtual 5K to help raise funds and awareness. We’re going to do a lot more like that in the coming months.”

“We also maintain an internal SharePoint page where we upload the articles that we talk about in our meetings. There’s a diversity days calendar that we go through every month to highlight specific days around diversity so we can celebrate those.”

“In addition, we have a Yammer page where people can keep conversations going outside of the meetings. They can post any relevant articles, news headlines, TED Talks — things like that.”

Finding an Identity

Once the group was up and running, Reynolds and Kain decided it needed to be more than just the “Diversity & Inclusion Committee.” It needed an identity.

“I was thinking of what we actually do in the group,” said Reynolds. “We give people an opportunity to speak. We give them a voice, a platform to share their experiences. The purpose of this group is to give people an opportunity to resonate verbally, spiritually amd emotionally, so that people can learn from one another. The name ‘Resonate’ fit perfectly.”

A Safe Space

Kain admits that it took a while for employees to feel comfortable opening up on uncomfortable topics. “In the beginning, everyone was keen on being a part of the group, but it took a while for them to realize it really was a safe space. A couple of people volunteered at the beginning to open share. Then we had a couple of volunteer speakers in the meetings. And that’s when people started to feel comfortable opening up.”

“Since then, it’s been amazing to how something that Bryan and I built from the ground up has become a place where employees get to share experiences, life stories, concerns and questions with no judgment, no attacking.”

No Magic Formula

Reynolds and Kain stress that there’s no magic formula for what they did. “We just recognized that there was a need,” Kain said. “So we set about meeting it.”

“We didn’t really know where to start. It was just put together step by step. We started with foundational items like the mission statement and went from there.”

The duo enlisted the aid of a few committee members to develop things like meeting content and community outreach.

“I’m not sure anyone really knows where or how to start,” said Kain. “My biggest piece of advice would be…

Aug 25

Diversity & Inclusion How-To: TBI’s Resonate Committee

By | Managed Services News

The committee encourages TBI’s nearly 300 employees to “Speak Strong. Listen Loud.”

TBI’s Diversity & Inclusion Committee (Resonate) was still being developed when the events of June 2020 made it a priority.

TBI's Bryan Reynolds

TBI’s Bryan Reynolds

“The events of that summer definitely were a catalyst,” said Bryan Reynolds, TBI’s director of sales operations.

“We wanted to be able to give everybody involved with the company a safe space to come and talk about everything that was happening in the world.”

“People need a place where they can ask questions and share experiences. Where they can talk about how the headlines make them feel, their fears — just generally learn from one another,” said Reynolds.

TBI's Ashley Kain

TBI’s Ashley Kain

Reynolds and Ashley Kain, TBI’s office manager and executive assistant, co-founded and currently co-chair the committee.

Open Share

The committee, launched in June 2020, was well-received by employees. The group meets once a month. Each meeting starts with an “open share,” which allows participants to share anything they want with the group.

“It could be their struggles, their successes or their concerns,” Reynolds said. “That gives us a starting point for the kind of conversations that people generally don’t want to have.”

“We have a comfortable, safe space to ask the uncomfortable questions. We all learn from that. And that’s what stimulates most of the conversation.”

“Ashley and I will also have some topics of discussion. For example, in our last meeting we talked about how to be a good ally in the workplace and things we can do to be better allies.”

Bryan Reynolds is a charter member of the Channel Futures DE&I 101. The list, which debuted earlier this month, honors 101 individuals from multicultural backgrounds who are working to promote diversity, equity and inclusion in the ICT channel.

“We also encourage our members to give back to the community. For example, we recently teamed up with Meals on Wheels for Chicago. We registered for their virtual 5K to help raise funds and awareness. We’re going to do a lot more like that in the coming months.”

“We also maintain an internal SharePoint page where we upload the articles that we talk about in our meetings. There’s a diversity days calendar that we go through every month to highlight specific days around diversity so we can celebrate those.”

“In addition, we have a Yammer page where people can keep conversations going outside of the meetings. They can post any relevant articles, news headlines, TED Talks — things like that.”

Finding an Identity

Once the group was up and running, Reynolds and Kain decided it needed to be more than just the “Diversity & Inclusion Committee.” It needed an identity.

“I was thinking of what we actually do in the group,” said Reynolds. “We give people an opportunity to speak. We give them a voice, a platform to share their experiences. The purpose of this group is to give people an opportunity to resonate verbally, spiritually amd emotionally, so that people can learn from one another. The name ‘Resonate’ fit perfectly.”

A Safe Space

Kain admits that it took a while for employees to feel comfortable opening up on uncomfortable topics. “In the beginning, everyone was keen on being a part of the group, but it took a while for them to realize it really was a safe space. A couple of people volunteered at the beginning to open share. Then we had a couple of volunteer speakers in the meetings. And that’s when people started to feel comfortable opening up.”

“Since then, it’s been amazing to how something that Bryan and I built from the ground up has become a place where employees get to share experiences, life stories, concerns and questions with no judgment, no attacking.”

No Magic Formula

Reynolds and Kain stress that there’s no magic formula for what they did. “We just recognized that there was a need,” Kain said. “So we set about meeting it.”

“We didn’t really know where to start. It was just put together step by step. We started with foundational items like the mission statement and went from there.”

The duo enlisted the aid of a few committee members to develop things like meeting content and community outreach.

“I’m not sure anyone really knows where or how to start,” said Kain. “My biggest piece of advice would be…

Aug 25

Diversity & Inclusion How-To: TBI’s Resonate Committee

By | Managed Services News

The committee encourages TBI’s nearly 300 employees to “Speak Strong. Listen Loud.”

TBI’s Diversity & Inclusion Committee (Resonate) was still being developed when the events of June 2020 made it a priority.

TBI's Bryan Reynolds

TBI’s Bryan Reynolds

“The events of that summer definitely were a catalyst,” said Bryan Reynolds, TBI’s director of sales operations.

“We wanted to be able to give everybody involved with the company a safe space to come and talk about everything that was happening in the world.”

“People need a place where they can ask questions and share experiences. Where they can talk about how the headlines make them feel, their fears — just generally learn from one another,” said Reynolds.

TBI's Ashley Kain

TBI’s Ashley Kain

Reynolds and Ashley Kain, TBI’s office manager and executive assistant, co-founded and currently co-chair the committee.

Open Share

The committee, launched in June 2020, was well-received by employees. The group meets once a month. Each meeting starts with an “open share,” which allows participants to share anything they want with the group.

“It could be their struggles, their successes or their concerns,” Reynolds said. “That gives us a starting point for the kind of conversations that people generally don’t want to have.”

“We have a comfortable, safe space to ask the uncomfortable questions. We all learn from that. And that’s what stimulates most of the conversation.”

“Ashley and I will also have some topics of discussion. For example, in our last meeting we talked about how to be a good ally in the workplace and things we can do to be better allies.”

Bryan Reynolds is a charter member of the Channel Futures DE&I 101. The list, which debuted earlier this month, honors 101 individuals from multicultural backgrounds who are working to promote diversity, equity and inclusion in the ICT channel.

“We also encourage our members to give back to the community. For example, we recently teamed up with Meals on Wheels for Chicago. We registered for their virtual 5K to help raise funds and awareness. We’re going to do a lot more like that in the coming months.”

“We also maintain an internal SharePoint page where we upload the articles that we talk about in our meetings. There’s a diversity days calendar that we go through every month to highlight specific days around diversity so we can celebrate those.”

“In addition, we have a Yammer page where people can keep conversations going outside of the meetings. They can post any relevant articles, news headlines, TED Talks — things like that.”

Finding an Identity

Once the group was up and running, Reynolds and Kain decided it needed to be more than just the “Diversity & Inclusion Committee.” It needed an identity.

“I was thinking of what we actually do in the group,” said Reynolds. “We give people an opportunity to speak. We give them a voice, a platform to share their experiences. The purpose of this group is to give people an opportunity to resonate verbally, spiritually amd emotionally, so that people can learn from one another. The name ‘Resonate’ fit perfectly.”

A Safe Space

Kain admits that it took a while for employees to feel comfortable opening up on uncomfortable topics. “In the beginning, everyone was keen on being a part of the group, but it took a while for them to realize it really was a safe space. A couple of people volunteered at the beginning to open share. Then we had a couple of volunteer speakers in the meetings. And that’s when people started to feel comfortable opening up.”

“Since then, it’s been amazing to how something that Bryan and I built from the ground up has become a place where employees get to share experiences, life stories, concerns and questions with no judgment, no attacking.”

No Magic Formula

Reynolds and Kain stress that there’s no magic formula for what they did. “We just recognized that there was a need,” Kain said. “So we set about meeting it.”

“We didn’t really know where to start. It was just put together step by step. We started with foundational items like the mission statement and went from there.”

The duo enlisted the aid of a few committee members to develop things like meeting content and community outreach.

“I’m not sure anyone really knows where or how to start,” said Kain. “My biggest piece of advice would be…

Aug 25

Biden Administration, Tech Giants Launch Initiatives to Fight Cybercrime

By | Managed Services News

Google and Microsoft are investing billions of dollars in new cybersecurity initiatives.

President Biden on Wednesday met with top executives from Alphabet/Google, Apple, IBM, Microsoft and other tech giants. The mission was to discuss how to more effectively combat cyber threats.

In addition to the tech giants, the security summit included several of giants in financial services, insurance, energy and education.

The summit comes after several massive cyberattacks, including ransomware attacks on Colonial Pipeline, JBS USA and Kaseya. Moreover, the volume of attacks has continued to increase, with more than 53 million T-Mobile customers impacted by a recent data breach on the carrier.

“We’ve seen time and again how the technologies we rely on, from our cellphones to pipelines to the electric grid can become targets of hackers and criminals,” Biden said in opening remarks.

The Biden administration announced the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) will collaborate with industry and other partners to develop a new framework to improve the security and integrity of the technology supply chain.

In addition, the Industrial Control Systems Cybersecurity Initiative now includes natural gas pipelines.

Tech Giants’ Initiatives

Among the tech giants:

  • Apple will establish a new program to drive continuous security improvements throughout the technology supply chain.
  • Google will invest $10 billion over the next five years to expand zero-trust programs. It will also help secure the software supply chain and enhance open-source security.
  • IBM will train 150,000 people in cybersecurity skills over the next three years. Furthermore, it will partner with more than 20 historically Black colleges and universities to establish cybersecurity leadership centers. This aims to grow a more diverse cyber workforce.
  • Microsoft will invest $20 billion over the next five years to integrate cybersecurity by design and deliver advanced security solutions.
  • Amazon will make available to the public at no charge the security awareness training it offers its employees.

Resilience, a cyber insurance provider, will require policy holders to meet a threshold of cybersecurity best practice to receive coverage. In addition, Coalition’s cybersecurity risk assessment and continuous monitoring platform will be available for free to any organization.

David Gerry is NTT Application Security‘s chief revenue officer.

NTT's David Gerry

NTT’s David Gerry

“This summit marks a positive step in raising awareness of the national cybersecurity attacks proliferating our nation’s private sectors,” he said. “The summit allows for ideas, best practices as well as transparency to be shared between technology vendors and government organizations. It’s great to see leaders within the financial and utilities sectors specifically, which have been hit hard this past year, come together to create actionable plans around proactive security strategies.”

Unique U.S. Challenge

John Bambenek is threat intelligence advisor at Netenrich.

Netenrich's John Bambeneck

Netenrich’s John Bambenek

“One of the unique challenges in the United States is that the overwhelming majority of critical infrastructure is owned and operated by private industry,” he said. “This has routinely been a stumbling block to effective coordination. But both the private and public sector need to make changes in order to truly protect the nation.”

Moreover, the barrier of entry into cybersecurity jobs is far too high, Bambenek said.

“The entry degree for cybersecurity should be at the associates level,” he said. “The government and military should use their resources to build a talent pipeline but, for instance, the military can keep access to these trained professionals via the Reserves or Guard.”

Jack Kudale is Cowbell Cyber‘s founder and CEO.

“SMEs are hurting the most from cyber incidents,” he said. “Initiatives to close insurability gaps and to make cyber insurance accessible to all will contribute the most in making the supply chains that are critical in the global economy more resilient to cyber threats. This includes standardization of coverage, flexibility and customization of policies as well as simplification of insurance applications.”

Aug 25

Comcast Acquisition ‘Golden Ticket’ for Masergy Channel Partners

By | Managed Services News

“The high-level win here for Comcast is the global enterprise game that Masergy knows how to play extremely well,” PlanetOne’s Ted Schuman said.

Partners and analysts are praising Comcast Business‘ acquisition of Masergy.

Philadelphia-based Comcast is buying Plano, Texas-based Masergy from Berkshire Partners for an undisclosed amount. The deal strengthens Comcast’s enterprise customer base and deepens its SD-WAN and remote work portfolio. On the other hand, it allows Berkshire to cash out on a high note after buying Masergy for reportedly around $900 million in 2016.

The channel community has almost uniformly applauded the deal. That starts with Masergy channel chief Jim Glackin, who expressed his delight on LinkedIn.

Glackin LinkedIn

Source: LinkedIn

Mike Onystok, TBI‘s senior vice president of operations, said Masergy and Comcast complement each other very well.

TBI's Mike Onystok

TBI’s Mike Onystok

“The resources, reach and brand recognition Comcast has are undoubtedly in the top echelon of providers in the channel. The ability to combine this position with Masergy’s focus on providing next-gen solutions such as security, white glove service and deployment, and their catering to the global or mid-enterprise client provides a strong foundation to fill gaps for both in existing offering and focus,” Onystok.

Onystok and many of his peers in the industry agree that both companies levy a deep channel footprint.

“These are both household names in the channel community and the two together stand to be one of the strongest players in this space in the very near term,” he said.

Partner and channel consultant Peter Radizeski noted how both companies benefited.

Analyst Zeus Kerravala agreed that private equity firms have typically sold by the end of five years. And considering that Masergy flourished during the pandemic with its remote work solutions, Berkshire was absolutely selling high.

“We are seeing more and more companies look to modernize their networks in preparation for more cloud or more work from home,” Kerravala said.

Check out our slideshow above to read reactions from partners and analysts about Comcast’s big acquisition.

Aug 25

Alert Logic, Arctic Wolf, CrowdStrike Named Among MDR Leaders

By | Managed Services News

Alert Logic, Arctic Wolf, eSentire, FireEye and Rapid7 are among companies listed as leaders in the IDC MarketScape U.S. managed detection and response (MDR) services vendor assessment.

Also listed as leaders are CrowdStrike, Expel and Secureworks. In addition, IDC listed AT&T, Deepwatch, GoSecure, Netsurion, Red Canary, Sophos and Verizon among “major players.”

Craig Robinson is IDC’s program director for security services.

IDC's Craig Robinson

IDC’s Craig Robinson

“The market for comprehensive MDR solutions continues to see double-digit growth,” he said. “The industry has expanded MDR beyond traditional detection and response, incorporating next-generation machine learning/artificial intelligence (ML/AI) capabilities, threat hunting teams and customized threat intelligence to combat modern-day cyber threats. The companies named to the leaders category in this space are the vendors who seamlessly marry these capabilities into one streamlined managed service.”

In this MDR study, IDC explored how MDR providers are evolving their businesses, technologies and offerings to detect and respond to modern cyberattacks. IDC asked MDR providers to demonstrate advanced capabilities that provide detection and deliver rapid, effective response actions.

MarketScape Criteria

Using the IDC MarketScape model, IDC studied 15 vendors that provide MDR in the United States. It surveyed providers’ customers that use their services.

The vendors included in the study had to meet certain criteria to qualify:

  • Geographic presence. Each vendor needed a minimum of 70% of its MDR revenue within the United States.
  • Customer base. In 2020, vendors had to have a presence within the midsize to enterprise segment, with 100-plus customers.
  • MDR capability. The MDR service providers must have a well-trained cybersecurity staff in a 24x7x365 remote security operations center (SOC).

Scroll through our slideshow above for more on the 15 vendors (listed alphabetically) in the IDC study — including what makes them successful and where they fall a little short.

Aug 25

Diversity & Inclusion How-To: TBI’s Resonate Committee

By | Managed Services News

The committee encourages TBI’s nearly 300 employees to “Speak Strong. Listen Loud.”

TBI’s Diversity & Inclusion Committee (Resonate) was still being developed when the events of June 2020 made it a priority.

TBI's Bryan Reynolds

TBI’s Bryan Reynolds

“The events of that summer definitely were a catalyst,” said Bryan Reynolds, TBI’s director of sales operations.

“We wanted to be able to give everybody involved with the company a safe space to come and talk about everything that was happening in the world.”

“People need a place where they can ask questions and share experiences. Where they can talk about how the headlines make them feel, their fears — just generally learn from one another,” said Reynolds.

TBI's Ashley Kain

TBI’s Ashley Kain

Reynolds and Ashley Kain, TBI’s office manager and executive assistant, co-founded and currently co-chair the committee.

Open Share

The committee, launched in June 2020, was well-received by employees. The group meets once a month. Each meeting starts with an “open share,” which allows participants to share anything they want with the group.

“It could be their struggles, their successes or their concerns,” Reynolds said. “That gives us a starting point for the kind of conversations that people generally don’t want to have.”

“We have a comfortable, safe space to ask the uncomfortable questions. We all learn from that. And that’s what stimulates most of the conversation.”

“Ashley and I will also have some topics of discussion. For example, in our last meeting we talked about how to be a good ally in the workplace and things we can do to be better allies.”

Bryan Reynolds is a charter member of the Channel Futures DE&I 101. The list, which debuted earlier this month, honors 101 individuals from multicultural backgrounds who are working to promote diversity, equity and inclusion in the ICT channel.

“We also encourage our members to give back to the community. For example, we recently teamed up with Meals on Wheels for Chicago. We registered for their virtual 5K to help raise funds and awareness. We’re going to do a lot more like that in the coming months.”

“We also maintain an internal SharePoint page where we upload the articles that we talk about in our meetings. There’s a diversity days calendar that we go through every month to highlight specific days around diversity so we can celebrate those.”

“In addition, we have a Yammer page where people can keep conversations going outside of the meetings. They can post any relevant articles, news headlines, TED Talks — things like that.”

Finding an Identity

Once the group was up and running, Reynolds and Kain decided it needed to be more than just the “Diversity & Inclusion Committee.” It needed an identity.

“I was thinking of what we actually do in the group,” said Reynolds. “We give people an opportunity to speak. We give them a voice, a platform to share their experiences. The purpose of this group is to give people an opportunity to resonate verbally, spiritually amd emotionally, so that people can learn from one another. The name ‘Resonate’ fit perfectly.”

A Safe Space

Kain admits that it took a while for employees to feel comfortable opening up on uncomfortable topics. “In the beginning, everyone was keen on being a part of the group, but it took a while for them to realize it really was a safe space. A couple of people volunteered at the beginning to open share. Then we had a couple of volunteer speakers in the meetings. And that’s when people started to feel comfortable opening up.”

“Since then, it’s been amazing to how something that Bryan and I built from the ground up has become a place where employees get to share experiences, life stories, concerns and questions with no judgment, no attacking.”

No Magic Formula

Reynolds and Kain stress that there’s no magic formula for what they did. “We just recognized that there was a need,” Kain said. “So we set about meeting it.”

“We didn’t really know where to start. It was just put together step by step. We started with foundational items like the mission statement and went from there.”

The duo enlisted the aid of a few committee members to develop things like meeting content and community outreach.

“I’m not sure anyone really knows where or how to start,” said Kain. “My biggest piece of advice would be…

Aug 25

Diversity & Inclusion How-To: TBI’s Resonate Committee

By | Managed Services News

The committee encourages TBI’s nearly 300 employees to “Speak Strong. Listen Loud.”

TBI’s Diversity & Inclusion Committee (Resonate) was still being developed when the events of June 2020 made it a priority.

TBI's Bryan Reynolds

TBI’s Bryan Reynolds

“The events of that summer definitely were a catalyst,” said Bryan Reynolds, TBI’s director of sales operations.

“We wanted to be able to give everybody involved with the company a safe space to come and talk about everything that was happening in the world.”

“People need a place where they can ask questions and share experiences. Where they can talk about how the headlines make them feel, their fears — just generally learn from one another,” said Reynolds.

TBI's Ashley Kain

TBI’s Ashley Kain

Reynolds and Ashley Kain, TBI’s office manager and executive assistant, co-founded and currently co-chair the committee.

Open Share

The committee, launched in June 2020, was well-received by employees. The group meets once a month. Each meeting starts with an “open share,” which allows participants to share anything they want with the group.

“It could be their struggles, their successes or their concerns,” Reynolds said. “That gives us a starting point for the kind of conversations that people generally don’t want to have.”

“We have a comfortable, safe space to ask the uncomfortable questions. We all learn from that. And that’s what stimulates most of the conversation.”

“Ashley and I will also have some topics of discussion. For example, in our last meeting we talked about how to be a good ally in the workplace and things we can do to be better allies.”

Bryan Reynolds is a charter member of the Channel Futures DE&I 101. The list, which debuted earlier this month, honors 101 individuals from multicultural backgrounds who are working to promote diversity, equity and inclusion in the ICT channel.

“We also encourage our members to give back to the community. For example, we recently teamed up with Meals on Wheels for Chicago. We registered for their virtual 5K to help raise funds and awareness. We’re going to do a lot more like that in the coming months.”

“We also maintain an internal SharePoint page where we upload the articles that we talk about in our meetings. There’s a diversity days calendar that we go through every month to highlight specific days around diversity so we can celebrate those.”

“In addition, we have a Yammer page where people can keep conversations going outside of the meetings. They can post any relevant articles, news headlines, TED Talks — things like that.”

Finding an Identity

Once the group was up and running, Reynolds and Kain decided it needed to be more than just the “Diversity & Inclusion Committee.” It needed an identity.

“I was thinking of what we actually do in the group,” said Reynolds. “We give people an opportunity to speak. We give them a voice, a platform to share their experiences. The purpose of this group is to give people an opportunity to resonate verbally, spiritually amd emotionally, so that people can learn from one another. The name ‘Resonate’ fit perfectly.”

A Safe Space

Kain admits that it took a while for employees to feel comfortable opening up on uncomfortable topics. “In the beginning, everyone was keen on being a part of the group, but it took a while for them to realize it really was a safe space. A couple of people volunteered at the beginning to open share. Then we had a couple of volunteer speakers in the meetings. And that’s when people started to feel comfortable opening up.”

“Since then, it’s been amazing to how something that Bryan and I built from the ground up has become a place where employees get to share experiences, life stories, concerns and questions with no judgment, no attacking.”

No Magic Formula

Reynolds and Kain stress that there’s no magic formula for what they did. “We just recognized that there was a need,” Kain said. “So we set about meeting it.”

“We didn’t really know where to start. It was just put together step by step. We started with foundational items like the mission statement and went from there.”

The duo enlisted the aid of a few committee members to develop things like meeting content and community outreach.

“I’m not sure anyone really knows where or how to start,” said Kain. “My biggest piece of advice would be…

Aug 25

Diversity & Inclusion How-To: TBI’s Resonate Committee

By | Managed Services News

The committee encourages TBI’s nearly 300 employees to “Speak Strong. Listen Loud.”

TBI’s Diversity & Inclusion Committee (Resonate) was still being developed when the events of June 2020 made it a priority.

TBI's Bryan Reynolds

TBI’s Bryan Reynolds

“The events of that summer definitely were a catalyst,” said Bryan Reynolds, TBI’s director of sales operations.

“We wanted to be able to give everybody involved with the company a safe space to come and talk about everything that was happening in the world.”

“People need a place where they can ask questions and share experiences. Where they can talk about how the headlines make them feel, their fears — just generally learn from one another,” said Reynolds.

TBI's Ashley Kain

TBI’s Ashley Kain

Reynolds and Ashley Kain, TBI’s office manager and executive assistant, co-founded and currently co-chair the committee.

Open Share

The committee, launched in June 2020, was well-received by employees. The group meets once a month. Each meeting starts with an “open share,” which allows participants to share anything they want with the group.

“It could be their struggles, their successes or their concerns,” Reynolds said. “That gives us a starting point for the kind of conversations that people generally don’t want to have.”

“We have a comfortable, safe space to ask the uncomfortable questions. We all learn from that. And that’s what stimulates most of the conversation.”

“Ashley and I will also have some topics of discussion. For example, in our last meeting we talked about how to be a good ally in the workplace and things we can do to be better allies.”

Bryan Reynolds is a charter member of the Channel Futures DE&I 101. The list, which debuted earlier this month, honors 101 individuals from multicultural backgrounds who are working to promote diversity, equity and inclusion in the ICT channel.

“We also encourage our members to give back to the community. For example, we recently teamed up with Meals on Wheels for Chicago. We registered for their virtual 5K to help raise funds and awareness. We’re going to do a lot more like that in the coming months.”

“We also maintain an internal SharePoint page where we upload the articles that we talk about in our meetings. There’s a diversity days calendar that we go through every month to highlight specific days around diversity so we can celebrate those.”

“In addition, we have a Yammer page where people can keep conversations going outside of the meetings. They can post any relevant articles, news headlines, TED Talks — things like that.”

Finding an Identity

Once the group was up and running, Reynolds and Kain decided it needed to be more than just the “Diversity & Inclusion Committee.” It needed an identity.

“I was thinking of what we actually do in the group,” said Reynolds. “We give people an opportunity to speak. We give them a voice, a platform to share their experiences. The purpose of this group is to give people an opportunity to resonate verbally, spiritually amd emotionally, so that people can learn from one another. The name ‘Resonate’ fit perfectly.”

A Safe Space

Kain admits that it took a while for employees to feel comfortable opening up on uncomfortable topics. “In the beginning, everyone was keen on being a part of the group, but it took a while for them to realize it really was a safe space. A couple of people volunteered at the beginning to open share. Then we had a couple of volunteer speakers in the meetings. And that’s when people started to feel comfortable opening up.”

“Since then, it’s been amazing to how something that Bryan and I built from the ground up has become a place where employees get to share experiences, life stories, concerns and questions with no judgment, no attacking.”

No Magic Formula

Reynolds and Kain stress that there’s no magic formula for what they did. “We just recognized that there was a need,” Kain said. “So we set about meeting it.”

“We didn’t really know where to start. It was just put together step by step. We started with foundational items like the mission statement and went from there.”

The duo enlisted the aid of a few committee members to develop things like meeting content and community outreach.

“I’m not sure anyone really knows where or how to start,” said Kain. “My biggest piece of advice would be…

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