Category Archives for "Managed Services News"

Aug 19

Data Loss Disasters Come in Many Forms

By | Managed Services News

Hurricane season is a good time to reflect on the nature of disasters and how to prepare for the unexpected.

The convenience of data is also its greatest weakness. All it takes is a major storm–or something far more mundane–to lose access to data. Since there are a number of causes of data loss, it’s important to prepare for all of them. But it’s hard to prepare when you don’t know what to expect. We talked with Carbonite VP of Product Management Jamie Zajac about how to anticipate the types of disasters that catch a lot of people and businesses off guard.

Get Woke to Data Loss

When most people think of data loss, they think major disasters, like headline-generating storms and floods. Of course, it’s important to anticipate highly impactful outages. But these are far more rare than other causes of data loss. “It’s everyday scenarios that are really common. Like leaving a laptop on an airplane, dropping a phone in the river, or accidentally deleting a folder and having the recycle bin policies expire,” Zajac says.

Another cause of data loss is hardware failure. “Hardware has become more reliable,” Zajac says, “but you never know when a hard drive will fail, a computer will be dropped or a motherboard will crash.”

Since hardware has a finite lifespan, failure is inevitable. When you’re considering how to protect devices that store important data, Zajac recommends looking for a few key features:

  • Continuous backup (so you’re capturing changes as you make them)
  • Online file recovery (so you don’t have to wait for a new computer)
  • Cloud failover for critical servers or disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS)

An Ounce of Prevention

Whether it’s a lack of awareness, the complexity of systems or the perceived difficulty of deploying protection, too many people and businesses fail to protect themselves ahead of time. “We often don’t think to make cyber security and data protection a priority until it’s too late,” Zajac says. “For consumers and business alike, we see a ton of inquiries about how to get data off a hard drive that wasn’t backed up. That is way more time-consuming, expensive, error-prone and ineffective than having a full cyber resilience and protection plan in place.”

“It’s never worth the risk of being hacked,” Zajac says. “I’ve seen businesses struggle and even close when they lose data, or their brands suffer because hackers have stolen their data. As compliance requirements and privacy requirements evolve, more and more small businesses face these risks.”

Hurricane Checklist

Hurricane season is prime time for system outages. But it’s also a useful reminder to prepare for the unexpected. Here are three key steps you can take to form a strategy for dealing with annually occurring threats, according  to Zajac.

  1. Anticipate your office being unavailable: Like the physical disruptions we’ve experienced with the COVID-19 pandemic, anticipate IT infrastructure becoming unavailable. Can you run systems in the cloud? Can you access a cloud backup quickly? DRaaS is a great solution for businesses susceptible to hurricanes.
  2. Back up everything, not just some things: Many people realize too late that they only chose to back up critical systems, and that one of those “second-tier” systems is also necessary to run the business. It’s better to have everything backed up than to be missing something. You can often save costs by tiering your backups or having different recovery objectives for different systems. But don’t skip backing up some systems.
  3. Test your backups: Know whether you can recover systems within the time required.

An All-of-the-Above Approach

Murphy’s Law dictates that you’ll probably experience the one form of data loss you’re not prepared for. Any form of data loss can have bad effects. So, if you’re too narrowly focused on just one threat, consider all the potential adverse events you could experience.

“Hackers are a constant threat and can have really big impacts in terms of

Aug 19

New Dell Channel Chief: Why Analysts, Partners Like the Choice

By | Managed Services News

Dell Technologies’ strategy for choosing Rola Dagher as global channel chief goes outside of the company’s [virtual] walls — sort of. In her two-decade-plus career, Dagher spent five years at Dell.

Prior to her current role as president, Cisco Systems Canada, where she’s served since June 2017, Dagher worked as vice president and general manager, infrastructure solutions group at Dell EMC for eight months. Before that, she was general manager, enterprise solutions Canada, and executive sales director at Dell for a combined four years. She worked at Bell Canada for 15 years. She follows in the footsteps of Joyce Mullen, who left the top channel spot at Dell in July.

MNJ Technologies' Diane Bierman

MNJ Technologies’ Diane Bierman

“We are sorry to see Joyce leave the position and appreciate all of the programs that MNJ was able to leverage for our growth,” Diane Bierman, vice president of strategic partnerships and sourcing at MNJ Technologies, a gold Dell Technologies partner, told Channel Futures. “We are very excited to hear of Rola’s new role and look forward to hear of her priorities that will benefit MNJ’s growth goals.”

As Dell Technologies’ new global channel chief, Dagher will work closely with partners and lead the company’s global partner strategy and vision, enablement, program design and experience.

Canada Is Cheering

Canada-based
Long View Systems, a Dell EMC platinum business and services partner, is also ready for change in channel leadership at Dell.
Long View Systems' Kent MacDonald

Long View Systems’ Kent MacDonald

“I think Rola is a great choice, as she is returning to her roots with Dell and brings new perspective from her time at Cisco,” Kent MacDonald, senior vice president, strategic alliances at Long View, told Channel Futures. “Rola has always been a great supporter of the channel; thus, this bodes well for the Dell EMC channel.”

An interesting thing about Dagher’s time at Cisco — there, she worked for a company where more than 85% of revenue is partner driven. The figure at Dell hovers closer to the 50% mark.

MNJ’s Bierman is looking for experience in the channel and fresh ideas for growth.

“It is essential for MNJ to have strategic programs that align to our customer’s challenges where NMJ can continue to bring value to our customers,” she said.

Dell’s Deep Bench and Continuity

Dell's Rola Dagher

Dell’s Rola Dagher

Dell has a deep bench of channel expertise at the company. So it wouldn’t have been surprising if you thought the new Dell channel chief would have been an internal pick. Mullen vacated the top channel slot in July. We also learned this week that Paul Shaffer, vice president of sales, global commercial channels at Dell EMC, is moving on. He had a long tenure with the company.

In fact, after the news about Mullen’s departure broke, Bill Scannell, president of global sales and customer operations, who led Dell’s search for its next channel leader, often referred to the company’s great bench of channel leadership as a good place to find the company’s next channel leader — but not exclusively.

And clearly, that’s not the way things went.

Cheryl Cook, senior vice president, global partner, embedded and edge solutions marketing, since January, appears to have recently moved on from her role as senior vice president, global partner marketing, Dell EMC, which she held for just over three years. She recently celebrated …

Aug 19

Smarter Office 365 License Adoption & Management–Addressing 3 Adoption Blockers

By | Managed Services News

The reasons for lack of license adoption include poor understanding of user requirements, failure to monitor active workload usage and an inability to act on adoption data.

In this article, we will detail how you can help your customers increase user productivity and maximize their return on Office 365 licensing through a practical approach to effective license management. The first part of this two-part series focused on the over-purchasing of Office 365 licenses. Part two will cover Office 365 license adoption. 

The second phase of this process involves strategic outreach and helping your customers drive license adoption. There are a few reasons for lack of adoption–poor understanding of user requirements, failure to monitor active workload usage and an inability to act on adoption data.

Here’s how to address three adoption blockers:

Understand your user requirements to optimize Office 365 license adoption.

Set your users up for success to avoid disappointing adoption numbers and save money.

It is essential to understand that users will only adopt what they’re familiar with and what they need to effectively perform their job. Building out functional user profiles is helpful to document user requirements. You could use user experience (UX) techniques to match workload functionality to specific roles. Depending on the size of the customer organization, a logical place to start is interviewing stakeholders and a variety of users throughout the organization and then confirming the profiles among larger groups of users.

Identifying mobile users is a notable example of how building a profile can result in quick wins. Many times, frontline workers access information exclusively on their mobile devices, which means they require web-only access to Office 365 applications. These workers might not need desktop apps and are unlikely to fully adopt a license, which includes apps that are primarily desktop apps.

This insight is helpful in two ways. First, you can avoid over-purchasing for these users in the future, which will save money and maximize Office 365 license adoption. Second, if they have a license granting them desktop access, extremely low or non-existent adoption of those workloads might be acceptable. However, it would help if you considered this fact when looking at the overall license adoption as it might skew Office 365 license adoption rates.

Start with a baseline of your Office 365 license adoption by workload.

You cannot improve adoption if you’re unaware it’s underperforming.

 The second reason licenses are under-utilized and under-adopted is the lack of available data relating to active workload usage. Baselining workload adoption and active usage and embracing a data-driven approach is key to improving Office 365 license adoption. Workload-specific metrics help to highlight and visualize exactly how the user is using a license. Because different Office 365 license SKUs include varying workloads, it’s helpful to have and measure this more specific data to ensure your users are getting the full value of their license.

Drive action from insights.

Data alone isn’t enough to improve Office 365 adoption.

 The third reason that Office 365 license adoption suffers hinges upon

Aug 19

Smarter Office 365 License Adoption & Management–Addressing 3 Adoption Blockers

By | Managed Services News

The reasons for lack of license adoption include poor understanding of user requirements, failure to monitor active workload usage and an inability to act on adoption data.

In this article, we will detail how you can help your customers increase user productivity and maximize their return on Office 365 licensing through a practical approach to effective license management. The first part of this two-part series focused on the over-purchasing of Office 365 licenses. Part two will cover Office 365 license adoption. 

The second phase of this process involves strategic outreach and helping your customers drive license adoption. There are a few reasons for lack of adoption–poor understanding of user requirements, failure to monitor active workload usage and an inability to act on adoption data.

Here’s how to address three adoption blockers:

Understand your user requirements to optimize Office 365 license adoption.

Set your users up for success to avoid disappointing adoption numbers and save money.

It is essential to understand that users will only adopt what they’re familiar with and what they need to effectively perform their job. Building out functional user profiles is helpful to document user requirements. You could use user experience (UX) techniques to match workload functionality to specific roles. Depending on the size of the customer organization, a logical place to start is interviewing stakeholders and a variety of users throughout the organization and then confirming the profiles among larger groups of users.

Identifying mobile users is a notable example of how building a profile can result in quick wins. Many times, frontline workers access information exclusively on their mobile devices, which means they require web-only access to Office 365 applications. These workers might not need desktop apps and are unlikely to fully adopt a license, which includes apps that are primarily desktop apps.

This insight is helpful in two ways. First, you can avoid over-purchasing for these users in the future, which will save money and maximize Office 365 license adoption. Second, if they have a license granting them desktop access, extremely low or non-existent adoption of those workloads might be acceptable. However, it would help if you considered this fact when looking at the overall license adoption as it might skew Office 365 license adoption rates.

Start with a baseline of your Office 365 license adoption by workload.

You cannot improve adoption if you’re unaware it’s underperforming.

 The second reason licenses are under-utilized and under-adopted is the lack of available data relating to active workload usage. Baselining workload adoption and active usage and embracing a data-driven approach is key to improving Office 365 license adoption. Workload-specific metrics help to highlight and visualize exactly how the user is using a license. Because different Office 365 license SKUs include varying workloads, it’s helpful to have and measure this more specific data to ensure your users are getting the full value of their license.

Drive action from insights.

Data alone isn’t enough to improve Office 365 adoption.

 The third reason that Office 365 license adoption suffers hinges upon

Aug 19

Smarter Office 365 License Adoption & Management–Addressing 3 Adoption Blockers

By | Managed Services News

The reasons for lack of license adoption include poor understanding of user requirements, failure to monitor active workload usage and an inability to act on adoption data.

In this article, we will detail how you can help your customers increase user productivity and maximize their return on Office 365 licensing through a practical approach to effective license management. The first part of this two-part series focused on the over-purchasing of Office 365 licenses. Part two will cover Office 365 license adoption. 

The second phase of this process involves strategic outreach and helping your customers drive license adoption. There are a few reasons for lack of adoption–poor understanding of user requirements, failure to monitor active workload usage and an inability to act on adoption data.

Here’s how to address three adoption blockers:

Understand your user requirements to optimize Office 365 license adoption.

Set your users up for success to avoid disappointing adoption numbers and save money.

It is essential to understand that users will only adopt what they’re familiar with and what they need to effectively perform their job. Building out functional user profiles is helpful to document user requirements. You could use user experience (UX) techniques to match workload functionality to specific roles. Depending on the size of the customer organization, a logical place to start is interviewing stakeholders and a variety of users throughout the organization and then confirming the profiles among larger groups of users.

Identifying mobile users is a notable example of how building a profile can result in quick wins. Many times, frontline workers access information exclusively on their mobile devices, which means they require web-only access to Office 365 applications. These workers might not need desktop apps and are unlikely to fully adopt a license, which includes apps that are primarily desktop apps.

This insight is helpful in two ways. First, you can avoid over-purchasing for these users in the future, which will save money and maximize Office 365 license adoption. Second, if they have a license granting them desktop access, extremely low or non-existent adoption of those workloads might be acceptable. However, it would help if you considered this fact when looking at the overall license adoption as it might skew Office 365 license adoption rates.

Start with a baseline of your Office 365 license adoption by workload.

You cannot improve adoption if you’re unaware it’s underperforming.

 The second reason licenses are under-utilized and under-adopted is the lack of available data relating to active workload usage. Baselining workload adoption and active usage and embracing a data-driven approach is key to improving Office 365 license adoption. Workload-specific metrics help to highlight and visualize exactly how the user is using a license. Because different Office 365 license SKUs include varying workloads, it’s helpful to have and measure this more specific data to ensure your users are getting the full value of their license.

Drive action from insights.

Data alone isn’t enough to improve Office 365 adoption.

 The third reason that Office 365 license adoption suffers hinges upon

Aug 19

Smarter Office 365 License Adoption & Management–Addressing 3 Adoption Blockers

By | Managed Services News

The reasons for lack of license adoption include poor understanding of user requirements, failure to monitor active workload usage and an inability to act on adoption data.

In this article, we will detail how you can help your customers increase user productivity and maximize their return on Office 365 licensing through a practical approach to effective license management. The first part of this two-part series focused on the over-purchasing of Office 365 licenses. Part two will cover Office 365 license adoption. 

The second phase of this process involves strategic outreach and helping your customers drive license adoption. There are a few reasons for lack of adoption–poor understanding of user requirements, failure to monitor active workload usage and an inability to act on adoption data.

Here’s how to address three adoption blockers:

Understand your user requirements to optimize Office 365 license adoption.

Set your users up for success to avoid disappointing adoption numbers and save money.

It is essential to understand that users will only adopt what they’re familiar with and what they need to effectively perform their job. Building out functional user profiles is helpful to document user requirements. You could use user experience (UX) techniques to match workload functionality to specific roles. Depending on the size of the customer organization, a logical place to start is interviewing stakeholders and a variety of users throughout the organization and then confirming the profiles among larger groups of users.

Identifying mobile users is a notable example of how building a profile can result in quick wins. Many times, frontline workers access information exclusively on their mobile devices, which means they require web-only access to Office 365 applications. These workers might not need desktop apps and are unlikely to fully adopt a license, which includes apps that are primarily desktop apps.

This insight is helpful in two ways. First, you can avoid over-purchasing for these users in the future, which will save money and maximize Office 365 license adoption. Second, if they have a license granting them desktop access, extremely low or non-existent adoption of those workloads might be acceptable. However, it would help if you considered this fact when looking at the overall license adoption as it might skew Office 365 license adoption rates.

Start with a baseline of your Office 365 license adoption by workload.

You cannot improve adoption if you’re unaware it’s underperforming.

 The second reason licenses are under-utilized and under-adopted is the lack of available data relating to active workload usage. Baselining workload adoption and active usage and embracing a data-driven approach is key to improving Office 365 license adoption. Workload-specific metrics help to highlight and visualize exactly how the user is using a license. Because different Office 365 license SKUs include varying workloads, it’s helpful to have and measure this more specific data to ensure your users are getting the full value of their license.

Drive action from insights.

Data alone isn’t enough to improve Office 365 adoption.

 The third reason that Office 365 license adoption suffers hinges upon

Aug 19

Smarter Office 365 License Adoption & Management–Addressing 3 Adoption Blockers

By | Managed Services News

The reasons for lack of license adoption include poor understanding of user requirements, failure to monitor active workload usage and an inability to act on adoption data.

In this article, we will detail how you can help your customers increase user productivity and maximize their return on Office 365 licensing through a practical approach to effective license management. The first part of this two-part series focused on the over-purchasing of Office 365 licenses. Part two will cover Office 365 license adoption. 

The second phase of this process involves strategic outreach and helping your customers drive license adoption. There are a few reasons for lack of adoption–poor understanding of user requirements, failure to monitor active workload usage and an inability to act on adoption data.

Here’s how to address three adoption blockers:

Understand your user requirements to optimize Office 365 license adoption.

Set your users up for success to avoid disappointing adoption numbers and save money.

It is essential to understand that users will only adopt what they’re familiar with and what they need to effectively perform their job. Building out functional user profiles is helpful to document user requirements. You could use user experience (UX) techniques to match workload functionality to specific roles. Depending on the size of the customer organization, a logical place to start is interviewing stakeholders and a variety of users throughout the organization and then confirming the profiles among larger groups of users.

Identifying mobile users is a notable example of how building a profile can result in quick wins. Many times, frontline workers access information exclusively on their mobile devices, which means they require web-only access to Office 365 applications. These workers might not need desktop apps and are unlikely to fully adopt a license, which includes apps that are primarily desktop apps.

This insight is helpful in two ways. First, you can avoid over-purchasing for these users in the future, which will save money and maximize Office 365 license adoption. Second, if they have a license granting them desktop access, extremely low or non-existent adoption of those workloads might be acceptable. However, it would help if you considered this fact when looking at the overall license adoption as it might skew Office 365 license adoption rates.

Start with a baseline of your Office 365 license adoption by workload.

You cannot improve adoption if you’re unaware it’s underperforming.

 The second reason licenses are under-utilized and under-adopted is the lack of available data relating to active workload usage. Baselining workload adoption and active usage and embracing a data-driven approach is key to improving Office 365 license adoption. Workload-specific metrics help to highlight and visualize exactly how the user is using a license. Because different Office 365 license SKUs include varying workloads, it’s helpful to have and measure this more specific data to ensure your users are getting the full value of their license.

Drive action from insights.

Data alone isn’t enough to improve Office 365 adoption.

 The third reason that Office 365 license adoption suffers hinges upon

Aug 19

Smarter Office 365 License Adoption & Management–Addressing 3 Adoption Blockers

By | Managed Services News

The reasons for lack of license adoption include poor understanding of user requirements, failure to monitor active workload usage and an inability to act on adoption data.

In this article, we will detail how you can help your customers increase user productivity and maximize their return on Office 365 licensing through a practical approach to effective license management. The first part of this two-part series focused on the over-purchasing of Office 365 licenses. Part two will cover Office 365 license adoption. 

The second phase of this process involves strategic outreach and helping your customers drive license adoption. There are a few reasons for lack of adoption–poor understanding of user requirements, failure to monitor active workload usage and an inability to act on adoption data.

Here’s how to address three adoption blockers:

Understand your user requirements to optimize Office 365 license adoption.

Set your users up for success to avoid disappointing adoption numbers and save money.

It is essential to understand that users will only adopt what they’re familiar with and what they need to effectively perform their job. Building out functional user profiles is helpful to document user requirements. You could use user experience (UX) techniques to match workload functionality to specific roles. Depending on the size of the customer organization, a logical place to start is interviewing stakeholders and a variety of users throughout the organization and then confirming the profiles among larger groups of users.

Identifying mobile users is a notable example of how building a profile can result in quick wins. Many times, frontline workers access information exclusively on their mobile devices, which means they require web-only access to Office 365 applications. These workers might not need desktop apps and are unlikely to fully adopt a license, which includes apps that are primarily desktop apps.

This insight is helpful in two ways. First, you can avoid over-purchasing for these users in the future, which will save money and maximize Office 365 license adoption. Second, if they have a license granting them desktop access, extremely low or non-existent adoption of those workloads might be acceptable. However, it would help if you considered this fact when looking at the overall license adoption as it might skew Office 365 license adoption rates.

Start with a baseline of your Office 365 license adoption by workload.

You cannot improve adoption if you’re unaware it’s underperforming.

 The second reason licenses are under-utilized and under-adopted is the lack of available data relating to active workload usage. Baselining workload adoption and active usage and embracing a data-driven approach is key to improving Office 365 license adoption. Workload-specific metrics help to highlight and visualize exactly how the user is using a license. Because different Office 365 license SKUs include varying workloads, it’s helpful to have and measure this more specific data to ensure your users are getting the full value of their license.

Drive action from insights.

Data alone isn’t enough to improve Office 365 adoption.

 The third reason that Office 365 license adoption suffers hinges upon

Aug 19

Top Gun 51 Profile: Pat Hurley’s Acronis Cyber Protection Journey

By | Managed Services News

Patrick Hurley didn’t start out in tech, but followed his interests after beginning his career in finance.

At the start of his career, Acronis’ Patrick Hurley didn’t plan to be working in cyber protection.

Instead, after graduating from college, he joined the world of finance with Putnam Investments. Soon he moved into the mortgage industry with Nation One Mortgage and then to the former IndyMac Bank. But in 2008, life intervened and Hurley went to work for Acronis, following an interest he had in technology. Today, Hurley serves as Acronis VP and general manager for the Americas.

In his work at the Switzerland-based backup and disaster recovery provider, Hurley has gained a reputation as someone who effectively works with partners and customers daily.

Patrick Hurley of Acronis

Acronis’ Patrick Hurley

That’s the kind of leadership that earned Hurley’s selection as a Channel Partners Top Gun 51 award winner for 2020. The award recognizes channel executives who are driving partner success for their companies. Judges considered three criteria for this year’s winners. They are channel advocacy; commitment to partner business success; and dedication to earning the channel’s trust. To come up with the list, we solicited input from those who know channel executives best — distributors, master agents and industry analysts.

Hurley recently talked with Channel Futures about how he got started in the channel and found his career niche.

Channel Futures: Before joining Acronis 12 years ago, you had a very different career path. Initially, you worked in the banking and mortgage industries after earning your degree in political science at Boston College. So, after that, what brought you to working in the channel?

Acronis’ Patrick Hurley is part of Channel Partners/Channel Futures’ 2020 Top Gun 51. This program recognizes today’s channel executives who build and execute channel programs that drive partner, customer and supplier success. See the full list.

Patrick Hurley: In college, I had no idea what I wanted to do or what I wanted to be. When I was in school, I had a big interest in philosophy and history. I started out right after college in the financial services industry. Quickly I found out it wasn’t for me. I wanted to be in sales. So I got into the mortgage industry, but that tanked in the Great Recession of 2007. I always had a passion for technology, but I didn’t know a ton about it. I wanted to get my foot in the door and into the space.

CF: So that’s how you eventually landed at Acronis working with cyber protection products?

PH: I came in at fairly entry-level sales position to start. Then I started to rise through the ranks, from sales to account manager. I was then a territory manager, a sales manager, a director and then managed the public sector business. I got to know the channel well, then transitioned to an SMB role, which exposed me to a broader role. Ultimately, I became the VP of a region and was promoted to VP and GM of the Americas in 2015.

CP: What are your impressions about the channel today in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic?

PH: It’s a new world right now, and we’re still adapting to a new normal. It’s even harder getting the attention of our partners and customers. There are so many virtual events competing with each other. It makes it harder to …

Aug 19

Smarter Office 365 License Adoption & Management–Addressing 3 Adoption Blockers

By | Managed Services News

The reasons for lack of license adoption include poor understanding of user requirements, failure to monitor active workload usage and an inability to act on adoption data.

In this article, we will detail how you can help your customers increase user productivity and maximize their return on Office 365 licensing through a practical approach to effective license management. The first part of this two-part series focused on the over-purchasing of Office 365 licenses. Part two will cover Office 365 license adoption. 

The second phase of this process involves strategic outreach and helping your customers drive license adoption. There are a few reasons for lack of adoption–poor understanding of user requirements, failure to monitor active workload usage and an inability to act on adoption data.

Here’s how to address three adoption blockers:

Understand your user requirements to optimize Office 365 license adoption.

Set your users up for success to avoid disappointing adoption numbers and save money.

It is essential to understand that users will only adopt what they’re familiar with and what they need to effectively perform their job. Building out functional user profiles is helpful to document user requirements. You could use user experience (UX) techniques to match workload functionality to specific roles. Depending on the size of the customer organization, a logical place to start is interviewing stakeholders and a variety of users throughout the organization and then confirming the profiles among larger groups of users.

Identifying mobile users is a notable example of how building a profile can result in quick wins. Many times, frontline workers access information exclusively on their mobile devices, which means they require web-only access to Office 365 applications. These workers might not need desktop apps and are unlikely to fully adopt a license, which includes apps that are primarily desktop apps.

This insight is helpful in two ways. First, you can avoid over-purchasing for these users in the future, which will save money and maximize Office 365 license adoption. Second, if they have a license granting them desktop access, extremely low or non-existent adoption of those workloads might be acceptable. However, it would help if you considered this fact when looking at the overall license adoption as it might skew Office 365 license adoption rates.

Start with a baseline of your Office 365 license adoption by workload.

You cannot improve adoption if you’re unaware it’s underperforming.

 The second reason licenses are under-utilized and under-adopted is the lack of available data relating to active workload usage. Baselining workload adoption and active usage and embracing a data-driven approach is key to improving Office 365 license adoption. Workload-specific metrics help to highlight and visualize exactly how the user is using a license. Because different Office 365 license SKUs include varying workloads, it’s helpful to have and measure this more specific data to ensure your users are getting the full value of their license.

Drive action from insights.

Data alone isn’t enough to improve Office 365 adoption.

 The third reason that Office 365 license adoption suffers hinges upon

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