Category Archives for "Managed Services News"

Mar 26

Sierra Wireless, CNA Ransomware Attacks Stoke Growing Industry Fears

By | Managed Services News

Trends suggest hackers will use ransomware more frequently in 2021.

If you weren’t already afraid of ransomware attacks, some of this week’s headlines serve as a chilling reminder of the potential devastation. A Sierra Wireless ransomware attack halted the IoT solution provider’s internal operations and production. Even the company’s website is down.

The company, which is active in the channel, said it discovered the attack on its internal IT systems on March 20. Since then, its IT and operations teams implemented measures to counter the attack.

In response to the ransomware attack, Sierra Wireless stopped production at its manufacturing sites. As of Friday, production has resumed and the company is working to bring internal IT systems back online, including its website.

The company isn’t commenting on who may be behind the attack or if they’re demanding a ransom.

Cyber Insurance Provider Also Attacked

CNA, one of the nation’s top cyber insurance providers, discovered it was victim of a sophisticated cyberattack on March 21. The attack caused a network disruption and impacted certain CNA systems, including corporate email. Its website also is down.

Bleeping Computer confirmed CNA suffered an attack by a new ransomware known as Phoenix CryptoLocker.

CynergisTek's Caleb Barlow

CynergisTek’s Caleb Barlow

Caleb Barlow is CEO of CynergisTek.

“It’s quite ironic they targeted the cybersecurity insurance company itself,” he said. “But it just demonstrates that anyone can be a victim. And everyone needs to be prepared to respond to a cybersecurity incident.”

Axio's Dave White

Axio’s Dave White

Ransomware attacks continue to rise with recent trends suggesting hackers will use ransomware more frequently in 2021 and beyond. That means companies need to be more vigilant than ever to prepare for attacks.

So what should organizations be doing to help ensure they’re not the next target? We spoke with Dave White, president of Axio, to find out.

See our slideshow above for our Q&A with White and more cybersecurity news making headlines this week.

Mar 26

Manufacturing & SD-WAN: The Challenges, the Opportunities

By | Managed Services News

The overall economy is beginning to recover from the impact of COVID-19. And as market growth improves, so do the prospects of selling SD-WAN. But those familiar with the SD-WAN market think adoption will play out differently in different verticals.

The manufacturing vertical, for example, exhibits an interesting polarization. SD-WAN is already widely in use and there is tremendous interest in increasing its usage even more. At the same time, however a sizable number of manufacturers don’t use SD-WAN and — for now, at least — don’t plan to. That’s more than any other vertical. So what’s going on?

In this report you will learn about:

  • Economic and technological trends in the manufacturing industry
  • What makes the vertical an intriguing target for SD-WAN deployment
  • The trends that could inhibit growth

About the Author

James Anderson is a news editor for Channel Partners and Channel Futures. He covers SD-WAN, wireless, cable, network services and the agent channel. He interned with Informa while working toward his degree in journalism from Arizona State University, then joined the company after graduating. He has served as a moderator for multiple panels at Channel Partners events.


Sponsored By

Comcast Business logo

 

 

 

 


Mar 26

Manufacturing & SD-WAN: The Challenges, the Opportunities

By | Managed Services News

The overall economy is beginning to recover from the impact of COVID-19. And as market growth improves, so do the prospects of selling SD-WAN. But those familiar with the SD-WAN market think adoption will play out differently in different verticals.

The manufacturing vertical, for example, exhibits an interesting polarization. SD-WAN is already widely in use and there is tremendous interest in increasing its usage even more. At the same time, however a sizable number of manufacturers don’t use SD-WAN and — for now, at least — don’t plan to. That’s more than any other vertical. So what’s going on?

In this report you will learn about:

  • Economic and technological trends in the manufacturing industry
  • What makes the vertical an intriguing target for SD-WAN deployment
  • The trends that could inhibit growth

About the Author

James Anderson is a news editor for Channel Partners and Channel Futures. He covers SD-WAN, wireless, cable, network services and the agent channel. He interned with Informa while working toward his degree in journalism from Arizona State University, then joined the company after graduating. He has served as a moderator for multiple panels at Channel Partners events.


Sponsored By

Comcast Business logo

 

 

 

 


Mar 26

MSPs Happy, Surprised, Concerned About Synnex-Tech Data Merger

By | Managed Services News

Some think the merger is terrific. Others worry about less choice and potential layoffs. It depends on whom you ask.

This week, Synnex and fellow distribution giant Tech Data announced a $7.2 billion mega merger. The combined company will have an estimated $57 billion in annual revenue and more than 22,000 employees. It will serve businesses in more than 100 countries across the Americas, Europe and Asia Pacific. Partners and customers will have access to more than 200,000 products and services.

This is not a casual deal — we’re talking about two of the world’s largest IT distributors here. We asked a few of our MSP 501ers to weigh in on the Synnex-Tech Data merger, and what they think it means for the mainstream MSP. The responses we got were varied, to say the least. Some are happy about the merger and think it makes sense for the two companies, as well as the industry as a whole. Others… not so much. 

Some say bigger isn’t always better, while some think a little healthy competition never hurt anyone. Some hail this as a boon for the MSP marketplace, while others see it as a negative transaction for the channel.

Scroll through our slideshow above to see exactly what our MSPs think about this major industry shake-up.

Mar 26

The Partner Opportunity Around Integrated XDR Solutions

By | Managed Services News

Keep network edges secure with the move to digital via automated security detection and response.

Fortinet's Jon Bove

Jon Bove

Digital innovation has been a critical business driver for most organizations, especially over the past 12 months. Now, following a year of high-profile ransomware and other cybersecurity incidents, many organizations are recognizing the exposure this innovation has created. Specifically, new work styles, increasing cloud delivery of applications and support for on- and off-network access has created a host of edges that need to be secured, including the edges of the wide area network such as SD-WAN, edge computing and LAN edge.

However, before acquiring even more security products designed to meet these mounting challenges, many security leaders recognize that complexity is already one of the leading challenges in cybersecurity.

This has led many businesses to reconsider their security strategy. In fact, according to a recent survey by Gartner, 80% of organizations are either currently or planning to consolidate vendors into an integrated solution set that is more manageable and effective. As they exist today, these tools typically work in isolation, keeping information separate between various controls or consoles. This means that security teams are left to manually coordinate events, a task that is often time-consuming and labor-intensive. Threats can fall through the cracks, ultimately going undetected and unresolved.

Value of Extended Detection and Response (XDR)

To stay ahead of today’s advanced threats and address the challenge of cybersecurity complexity, customers must have comprehensive visibility and control across their distributed networks. A major drawback of many security solutions is that their capabilities are often limited in scope, and even those with broad scope lack integration and automation. An emerging security concept being adopted by security teams to help fill this gap is extended detection and response (XDR). XDR is a “unified security incident detection and response platform that automatically collects and correlates data from multiple proprietary security components,” according to Gartner.

For partners, XDR solutions create an opportunity to offer customers a differentiated approach to what have been traditionally independent security categories – network security, endpoint security, email security and cloud security. Through a consolidating principle such as XDR, individual security solutions can see, share and analyze data, which helps teams more easily detect threats and guide a coordinated response that spans the entire attack surface.

Why Most XDR Solutions Fall Short

Extended detection and response presents an opportunity to combine multiple product solutions into an integrated system that focuses on detecting, investigating and responding to evolving threats. There are three challenges in accomplishing this.

The first challenge for many vendors is that their solutions fail to cover the entire attack surface, covering one or a few different attack vectors such as endpoint, cloud, email or network individually. The value in XDR lies in its ability to combine multiple solutions.

Another challenge is that though vendors may offer a full range of security products and solutions, those components may have been acquired individually over time and are loosely integrated. As a result, it’s a heavy lift to normalize and correlate security information from the components, which leaves little development resources for higher-value analytics and automation. Rather than providing a cohesive system in such situations, XDR instead loosely compensates for the platform’s inability to interoperate.

Investigation is the third challenge organizations typically face when choosing an XDR solution. If an XDR solution only focuses on detection and response, it leaves investigation on the shoulders of security analysts. An effective solution should autonomously perform a thorough investigation to determine a threat’s validity, nature and scope, freeing cybersecurity professionals up for higher-priority initiatives.

Key Considerations When Choosing an XDR Solution

Three key considerations to keep in mind are …

Mar 26

Manufacturing & SD-WAN: The Challenges, the Opportunities

By | Managed Services News

The overall economy is beginning to recover from the impact of COVID-19. And as market growth improves, so do the prospects of selling SD-WAN. But those familiar with the SD-WAN market think adoption will play out differently in different verticals.

The manufacturing vertical, for example, exhibits an interesting polarization. SD-WAN is already widely in use and there is tremendous interest in increasing its usage even more. At the same time, however a sizable number of manufacturers don’t use SD-WAN and — for now, at least — don’t plan to. That’s more than any other vertical. So what’s going on?

In this report you will learn about:

  • Economic and technological trends in the manufacturing industry
  • What makes the vertical an intriguing target for SD-WAN deployment
  • The trends that could inhibit growth

About the Author

James Anderson is a news editor for Channel Partners and Channel Futures. He covers SD-WAN, wireless, cable, network services and the agent channel. He interned with Informa while working toward his degree in journalism from Arizona State University, then joined the company after graduating. He has served as a moderator for multiple panels at Channel Partners events.


Sponsored By

Comcast Business logo

 

 

 

 


Mar 26

Manufacturing & SD-WAN: The Challenges, the Opportunities

By | Managed Services News

The overall economy is beginning to recover from the impact of COVID-19. And as market growth improves, so do the prospects of selling SD-WAN. But those familiar with the SD-WAN market think adoption will play out differently in different verticals.

The manufacturing vertical, for example, exhibits an interesting polarization. SD-WAN is already widely in use and there is tremendous interest in increasing its usage even more. At the same time, however a sizable number of manufacturers don’t use SD-WAN and — for now, at least — don’t plan to. That’s more than any other vertical. So what’s going on?

In this report you will learn about:

  • Economic and technological trends in the manufacturing industry
  • What makes the vertical an intriguing target for SD-WAN deployment
  • The trends that could inhibit growth

About the Author

James Anderson is a news editor for Channel Partners and Channel Futures. He covers SD-WAN, wireless, cable, network services and the agent channel. He interned with Informa while working toward his degree in journalism from Arizona State University, then joined the company after graduating. He has served as a moderator for multiple panels at Channel Partners events.


Sponsored By

Comcast Business logo

 

 

 

 


Mar 26

Manufacturing & SD-WAN: The Challenges, the Opportunities

By | Managed Services News

The overall economy is beginning to recover from the impact of COVID-19. And as market growth improves, so do the prospects of selling SD-WAN. But those familiar with the SD-WAN market think adoption will play out differently in different verticals.

The manufacturing vertical, for example, exhibits an interesting polarization. SD-WAN is already widely in use and there is tremendous interest in increasing its usage even more. At the same time, however a sizable number of manufacturers don’t use SD-WAN and — for now, at least — don’t plan to. That’s more than any other vertical. So what’s going on?

In this report you will learn about:

  • Economic and technological trends in the manufacturing industry
  • What makes the vertical an intriguing target for SD-WAN deployment
  • The trends that could inhibit growth

About the Author

James Anderson is a news editor for Channel Partners and Channel Futures. He covers SD-WAN, wireless, cable, network services and the agent channel. He interned with Informa while working toward his degree in journalism from Arizona State University, then joined the company after graduating. He has served as a moderator for multiple panels at Channel Partners events.


Sponsored By

Comcast Business logo

 

 

 

 


Mar 26

Manufacturing & SD-WAN: The Challenges, the Opportunities

By | Managed Services News

The overall economy is beginning to recover from the impact of COVID-19. And as market growth improves, so do the prospects of selling SD-WAN. But those familiar with the SD-WAN market think adoption will play out differently in different verticals.

The manufacturing vertical, for example, exhibits an interesting polarization. SD-WAN is already widely in use and there is tremendous interest in increasing its usage even more. At the same time, however a sizable number of manufacturers don’t use SD-WAN and — for now, at least — don’t plan to. That’s more than any other vertical. So what’s going on?

In this report you will learn about:

  • Economic and technological trends in the manufacturing industry
  • What makes the vertical an intriguing target for SD-WAN deployment
  • The trends that could inhibit growth

About the Author

James Anderson is a news editor for Channel Partners and Channel Futures. He covers SD-WAN, wireless, cable, network services and the agent channel. He interned with Informa while working toward his degree in journalism from Arizona State University, then joined the company after graduating. He has served as a moderator for multiple panels at Channel Partners events.


Sponsored By

Comcast Business logo

 

 

 

 


Mar 26

Manufacturing & SD-WAN: The Challenges, the Opportunities

By | Managed Services News

The overall economy is beginning to recover from the impact of COVID-19. And as market growth improves, so do the prospects of selling SD-WAN. But those familiar with the SD-WAN market think adoption will play out differently in different verticals.

The manufacturing vertical, for example, exhibits an interesting polarization. SD-WAN is already widely in use and there is tremendous interest in increasing its usage even more. At the same time, however a sizable number of manufacturers don’t use SD-WAN and — for now, at least — don’t plan to. That’s more than any other vertical. So what’s going on?

In this report you will learn about:

  • Economic and technological trends in the manufacturing industry
  • What makes the vertical an intriguing target for SD-WAN deployment
  • The trends that could inhibit growth

About the Author

James Anderson is a news editor for Channel Partners and Channel Futures. He covers SD-WAN, wireless, cable, network services and the agent channel. He interned with Informa while working toward his degree in journalism from Arizona State University, then joined the company after graduating. He has served as a moderator for multiple panels at Channel Partners events.


Sponsored By

Comcast Business logo

 

 

 

 


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